Thomas Sampson, Charles Sampson, and Turner’s Express

Sampson

Thomas Sampson 1807-1854

Jane Sampson 1819-1900

James Henry 1843-1846

Jane 1841-1915

Children of Thomas and Jane Sampson

Thomas Sampson came from England in 1830 with his wife and a baby. His wife died upon arrival, and he was remarried to Jane Johnson, who was Irish. He was a tinsmith and a printer.

Saint John, NB, 23 January 1854:

Deaths at Fredericton on the 17th inst. Mr. Thomas Sampson, aged 49 years, formerly of Devonshire, England.

The census for 1861 shows the widow Jane Sampson, 43, living with her children Thomas, 22, printer; Charles, 21; Jane, 19; John, 15; and William, 13. Hutchinson’s New Brunswick Directory for 1865-1866 lists Jane Sampson, widow of Thomas, and her two eldest sons located at Carleton near King Street. Thomas was a printer and Charles A. was an agent for Turner’s Express. Mary, Thomas Sampson’s daughter by his first wife, married John Harrison in 1859 at Portland, Maine.

New Brunswick Directory for 1865-66:

Turner’s American Express, Charles A. Sampson, Agent, Queen Street forwards packages and parcels of goods and money, goods purchased, notes, drafts and bills collected, Fredericton, St. John, Halifax, Boston, New York.

Turner’s Express was an active company, with agents in towns throughout the province. The elder Sampson may also have been connected with the business. In 1833 the schedule was Fredericton to Saint John, stopping overnight en route, proceeding the next day to Eastport, this part of the journey by stage. The following day at noon a sailing ship left Eastport for Boston, a trip that usually took two and a half days. This was speedier and more pleasant than going all the way by stage, which took eleven days.

The Gleaner, Fredericton, NB, 25 October, 1895:

Thomas Sampson, formerly of this city, but for some time back employed on the staff of a daily newspaper in Norwich, Conn., is in Fredericton on a visit. This is his first visit during 27 years. Mr. Sampson served his apprenticeship to the Art Preservative with the late John Simpson, Queen’s Printer in the Royal Gazette office. He is a brother of C.A. Sampson, Secretary of the Board of School Trustees. In his first stroll down Queen Street in 27 years, accompanied by his sister, he received quite an ovation from numerous old friends. About 1866 Mr. Sampson was an active member of the old Victoria Rifles (Capt. Simonds) of this city, as well as the old No. 1 engine company (Capt. John Moore) at present our esteemed city treasurer.

Jane, the widow of Thomas Sampson, is remembered as residing in Carleton Street with her unmarried daughter, “Jenny.” The family was prominent in the work of the Wilmot Church, and Charles Sampson was for many years Secretary of the Fredericton School Board.

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