The Hovey and Hooper families

Hovey

“Hovey” – there is nothing else inscribed on this handsome stone. The lot is #116 and is in the name of Stephen Hovey.

Sept. 27th [1866] Elizabeth Hovey claims on behalf of her father and his family a lot in the B. Ground, formally known as the "Hooper lot." Size about 18 feet square, and adjoining the Robb lot. Enclosed by a wooden railing. This lot was first purchased by Mrs. Hooper from Henry Chestnut.

Stephen Hovey, born 1812, a son of Stephen and Harriet Sayre Hovey, is most likely buried here, as well as his wife, Eliza Jane Agnew, born 1816. They lived in Fredericton from 1830 to 1900. Stephen Hovey was a filer on Charlotte Street. According to the census, 1861, their children were James, aged 22; Jane, 19; Rebecca and Harriet, twins, 17; Mary Alice, 14; Stephen E., 12; Allan, 10; Robert, 8; Isabell, 6; Charles, 4; and Elizabeth, 2. In the 1871 census the children of the household were Isabell, 15; Charles, 13; Elizabeth, 11; and Clara, 9. In the 1881 census, Stephen J. Hovey, 63, carpenter, and his wife Jane, 59, are listed with three of their daughters: Isabell, 24, a dressmaker; Lizzie, 20; and Clara, 18.

The first of the name, Aaron Hovey, came to the lower St. John River in 1769. In 1770 he claimed a 200-acre lot in consequence of a lease to Edmund Price, the father of his wife Dorothy. In 1783, according to the Studholm Report, he was living in Gagetown in a log house, with about 10 acres cleared. He eventually settled in the Miramichi. The children of Aaron Hovey and Dorothy Price were Janet, Abigail, Dorothy, Stephen (born 1783), Mary, Aaron (born 1788), Susanna (born 1793), Edmund (born 1795), James, Moses, Jacob Barker (born 1801), Allen, Jane (born 1797), and Asenath Ann (born 1808). Four daughters of Aaron Hovey married into Price families.

Aaron Hovey died 1839 in Ludlow, New Brunswick.

Royal Gazette, Fredericton, NB, 25 December 1839:

Died at Ludlow [Southwest Miramichi], after a short illness, This truly pious and exemplary Christian was born in Massachusetts, then a British colony, in 1761. He had been a resident of the parish of Ludlow for 28 years, during the whole of which period it had been his constant practice to assemble his neighbours upon the Sabbath day for the public worship of God. Upon these occasions he confined himself to reading the scriptures, prayer and exhortations to the holiness of life. His aim was to glorify his Creator and to benefit his destitute fellow men, not to exalt himself, hence his public devotions were marked by great simplicity and primitive brevity, and his private walk and conversation by manners plain and unassuming. To a neighbourhood devoid of regular religious instruction, as in the case with the community in which he lived, such a loss cannot easily be repaired. He closed his useful and blameless life on the 30th day of November, aged 78 years. He has left 126 descendants.

The Hoveys and Hoopers were related through marriage, and many unmarked graves of the Hooper family lie here.

In 1843, N.D. Hooper was a prominent member of the Kirk when the Reverend John M. Brooke arrived. In the 1860s, Nehemiah S. Hooper had a large business of groceries, liquors, and provisions, under the County Court House.

Isabel Agnew Hovey (born 1860) married, in 1880, W. Storey Hooper whose mother had been a Hovey. They lived at 114 George Street, which house had been owned and occupied for generations by the Hooper family. Storey Hooper, insurance agent, was manager of the Fredericton Exhibition Association and in 1912 was Mayor of Fredericton. He died in 1929, and his wife in 1940.

One thought on “The Hovey and Hooper families”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *