Abraham Henry Clark, builder

Clark

In memory of A. Henry Clark, died in Fredericton, July 11th, 1865 aged 56 years and his wife Christianna, died Feb. 5th, 1887 age 79 years.

Also their son Edwin B. who died at Jacksonville, Florida, April 4, 1871 in the 27th year of his age.

Footstones: “Mother” and “Father.”

Lot #44, 10 x 12 feet, was purchased in 1866 and contains one large stone inscribed on two sides. The engraved symbol on the top of Edwin Clark’s epitaph is an anchor and rope. There were five graves here enclosed by wooden paling painted black. Besides the graves of A. Henry Clark and his wife and son, there are two unmarked graves: Louisa Augusta, born 1 December 1837, died 22 August 1918; and George Samuel Clark, born 7 May 1846, died 12 December 1922.

Abraham Henry Clark, born 19 May 1807, was the eldest son of Samuel Clark and his wife Abigail Jewett. He was born on the farm at Keswick Ridge and became a house builder in Fredericton and was one of the best.

He married, on 7 May 1835, Christianna ("Ann") Bain, born 6 August 1808. This marriage was one of the first performed under the new law which permitted dissenting clergymen in New Brunswick to perform the marriage ceremony. Christianna Bain was of Scottish descent and a devout Christian. Prior to her death she was an invalid for some years.

Henry Clark brought his bride to a large house which he bought and improved — the King Street property of Thomas Everett. He subsequently built two houses in George Street.

The children of Henry and Christianna were Henry Bradford (1836-1921), Louisa Augusta (1837-1918), Charles Frederick (1841-1927), Edwin B. (1845-1871), and George Samuel (1846-1922).

Henry Bradford, the eldest son, a builder like his father, married Hannah Barker, daughter of Andrew Ritchie, also a noted builder of houses. She was a granddaughter of William Anderson, High Sheriff of York County (1801-1811), a noted Loyalist and a trader. His father, John Anderson, long connected with Nova Scotia as a trader and once a rival of Hazen, Simonds & White, bequeathed to his son William Anderson the 10,000-acre Monckton Grant and a tremendous debt. Henry Bradford Clark built the house in George Street, now numbered 759, in which he and his wife first resided and reared a family.

Miss Louisa Augusta and her youngest brother, George, remained unmarried and resided together for many years in one of the houses built by their father on George Street opposite the Old Burying Ground. George was employed by the Fred Edgecombe company for years as manager of one of the departments in the store.

Adams, Beckwith, Grigor, and Hart

Hart / Hartt

George Henry Hart born 1796 – 1877

Julia Catherine Hart born 10 March 1796 – 20 Nov. 1867

Marvin F. Hart born 1823 – 1902

Jane Hart born 1826 – 25 May 1865

Mary Grigor born [?] – Feb. 12, 1903

John Burnside Beckwith infant 1872

Harriet Augusta Beckwith born 1868 – April, 1872

William Adams [?] – 1851

Jane Adams [?] – 1861

Anne [?] – 1861

Charles [?] – 1868

James born 1849 – 1891

Beginning at George Street the first lot, 14 x 16 feet, was originally enclosed within an ornamental iron fence, with two gates, beautifully intact in 1955. Upon one gate was impressed “F. Marvin Hart, 1865.” This lot was owned by both the Hart and Adams families. It is quite likely that at least twelve bodies lie buried here. There were several monuments, some of each family.

Jackson Adams was a prosperous undertaker with a furniture business in Court House Square. Jackson Adams claimed one half of this lot in 1886, and his relatives are buried in that half on George Street. His wife was Elizabeth.

John, the father of Jackson Adams, born in Paisley, Scotland, had run away from home as a young man. John Adams came from a fine family, related to John Quincy Adams, a President of the United States. He was employed at Limavady, Northern Ireland, by a Mr. Jackson as gardener and groom. He drove the dog cart, the passenger and driver sitting back to back. Margaret Jackson, the daughter, fell in love with him and they eloped in 1822. Their eldest child, Jackson, was born 18 April 1824, at sea.

The remainder of the lot belonged to the Honourable J.A. Beckwith, the lot having been purchased by him in 1866.

It is puzzling that an official certificate of ownership was issued to F. Marvin Hart in August 1866. It was “purchased from Henry Chestnut by the Claimer. A receipt is held for payment.” In 1865, Marvin Hart buried his young wife, Jane Elizabeth Grigor, here. She was a granddaughter of Dr. Charles Earle who is buried elsewhere in the graveyard.

The two Beckwith children buried here are the grandchildren of the Hon. John A. Beckwith.

The Honourable John A. Beckwith descended paternally from the family of Beckwith, Norwich, England, and maternally from C.L. Le Brun de du Plessis, a relative of Armand du Plessis, Cardinal duc de Richelieu.

Born at Fredericton on 1 December 1800, John A. Beckwith was educated there and at Toronto, Montreal, and Windsor, Nova Scotia. He married, first, Annie L. Jouett, and secondly Maria A. Berton, both of Fredericton. He was a Mayor of Fredericton, Deputy Commissioner of Crown Lands and Surveyor General, Chairman of the Provincial Board of Agriculture, Director of the Quebec and New Brunswick Railway, and Major, 1st Battalion York County Militia. He was a member of the Executive Council and Provincial Secretary and Registrar (1867-1871). He sat for York County in the New Brunswick Assembly (1866-1874), when called to the Legislative Council.

F. Marvin Hart was a nephew of John A. Beckwith. He was a son of George Henry Hart and his wife Julia Catherine Beckwith Hart, Canada’s first published novelist.

Julia C. Beckwith was a daughter of Nehemiah Beckwith, a trader of Maugerville, who was drowned near Sheffield in 1818. Her mother was Julie-Louise Le Brun de Duplessis, daughter of Jean Baptiste Le Brun de Duplessis, one of Montcalm’s staff. She was brought to Fredericton as governess to Governor Carleton’s children. Julia was born in Fredericton in 1796 and spent much of her early life visiting her father’s relatives in Cornwallis Valley, Nova Scotia, and travelling by canoe along the St. John River to her mother’s relatives in Quebec. It was on one of these trips that she began her literary career with St. Ursula’s Convent, a story based on the experiences of a relative with the nuns. Following the death of her husband, Nehemiah, Julie-Louise took her family to Montreal and Kingston where they visited her relatives, returning after five or six years.

In Kingston, on 3 January 1822, Julia Catherine Beckwith married George Henry Hart, a bookbinder, and they resided there for a time. She completed her first novel. St. Ursula’s Convent; or, the Nun of Canada, Containing Scenes from Real Life (Kingston, Upper Canada, printed by Hugh C. Thomson, 1824, Boards, 2 Vols.) was published in Toronto. Four copies are known to exist: one in the Toronto Public Library, one in the Congressional Library, and two in the library of the University of New Brunswick. A second novel, Tonnawanda; or The Adopted Son of America, An Indian Story (Rochester, New York), was published sometime between 1826 and 1831. About 1826 the Harts moved to Rochester, New York, and in 1831 to Fredericton where Julia resided the rest of her life. George Henry Hart, her husband, was employed in the Crown Land Department. For many years she contributed to The Reporter.

George and Julia Hart had a family of seven children: Adolphus; Nehemiah Beckwith; James; F. Marvin, buried here; Charles L.; Julia, born in Fredericton 1838; and Theodore, born 1840.

F. Marvin Hart married Jane Elizabeth Grigor. The couple had two children: a son, Grigor Jonff, and a daughter, Marianne. They lived in the James Grigor “cottage,” the second house east of St. Dunstan’s Church, which survived a terrible fire in 1850. It was estimated that three hundred buildings were burned. Owing to the frantic exertions of the parishioners, the Church and this small cottage were saved. In 1862, F. Marvin Hart opened a clothing store, The Bee Hive, and operated it for half a century. According to Cathedral records, Jane Grigor Hart died in May 1865 aged 39. Late in the century, Marvin, then an old man, moved to Saint John where he lived out the rest of his life with his wife’s sister, Mary Grigor.

Herald, Fredericton, NB, 13 February 1903:

Miss Mary Grigor, a sister of the late Mrs. Hart (Jane) died in St. John yesterday at the home of her niece Mrs. Frank H. White. The remains will arrive here tomorrow morning, and will be interred in the old burying ground.

James White, watchmaker and engineer

White

In memory of Elizabeth wife of James White died July 23, 1873 aged 46 years "Gone but not forgotten"

Elizabeth, wife of James White, and her sister Euphremia (born 1826), were daughters of Alward and Mary Harned, all of whom are believed to be buried in this lot. Elizabeth White lived in the same house at 24 Waterloo Row all her life. It was built by her father. When she and James White married they lived there with her widowed mother, Mary.

James White was inventive. He was a watchmaker and exhibited an astronomical clock at the York County Agricultural Society Exhibition in 1852 and served on a committee for the promotion of manufactures in metal. He was the chief engineer of the Fredericton Fire Department in the 1870s.

In 1871, James was listed in the census as aged 45, Irish, Wesleyan Methodist, and a watchmaker. His wife Elizabeth was 44, and they had three children at that time: Emily Jane, 10; Henry, 6; and Frances, 3 years. Henry ("Harry") White, born 1865, became the manager of the gas works on Shore Street and a keen student of electrical devices. The telescope which stood in his garden was of great interest to young people. His brother, James Junior, was a dry goods merchant.

Lot #53. James White claims a lot in the Old P. B. Ground situate in the Old Part, This is a double lot and bounded as follows, on the north by Jus L Marsh’s lot, and on the south by the late John Anderson’s lot. Mr. White purchased the above lot from Geo Botsford in the year 1860.

Elizabeth Rebecca Sewell, wife of Henry White

White

Elizabeth Rebecca Sewell, wife of Henry White of Victoria County, is believed to have been born in Massachusetts. She died in 1827 and is thought to be buried here. The grave is unmarked.

According to family records, Henry and Elizabeth White came down river as far as the mouth of the Nashwaak. There Mrs. White left the canoe, intending to walk to the homestead on the Nashwaak while her husband continued down the St. John River to visit their married daughter, Mrs. Savage. She had walked only a few rods when she arranged a handkerchief on which to sit, and there Thomas Gill found her lying dead.

She died on Thursday, 16 August 1827, and a coroner’s inquest was held on the following Saturday. She was buried on Sunday, 19 August 1827.