Descendants of the Honourable and Reverend Jonathan Odell

Odell

Sacred to the memory of Elizabeth Ludlow, wife of George M. Odell, M.D., of Fredericton who died April 19, 1861 in the 35th year of her age. "Them that sleep in Jesus will God bring with him."

George Mountain Odell, M.D., died at Newport, Rhode Island, April 21, 1892 in the 75th year of his age. "I believe in the life everlasting."

Charles Odell, C.E., May 27, 1898. Sadie Odell, Dec. 3, 1910. Erected in loving memory of our dear father and mother.

These three tombstones are surrounded by a stone fence.

G.M. Odell at present at Newport State of Rhode Island claims a lot in the burying lot 18 x 24, situate in the north corner enclosed by a wooden fence set on stones. Purchased from Robert Wood about 1861.

The Honourable and Reverend Jonathan Odell came to New Brunswick in 1783 with the New England Loyalists. A clergyman of the Church of England, he was for many years the government Secretary of the Province. His only son, Hon. William Franklin Odell (1774-1844), also a Loyalist, had four sons: William Hunter, George Mountain, James, and Charles. The house in which they were born and brought up had been built by their grandfather, Rev. Jonathan Odell. Their father, William F. Odell, later built "Rookwood", and the original family home ultimately became a residence for the youngest son, Charles.

George Mountain Odell lived for some time in St. Mary’s on the Caleb Fowler farm, which his father subsequently bequeathed to him in 1844. In 1846 he bought a town house in Brunswick Street from Horatio Nelson Drake and married not long after.

Royal Gazette, Fredericton, NB, 3 November 1847:

Married on Tuesday, the 26th ult. at St. Paul’s Church, Halifax, by the Rev. Dr. Twining, Chaplain of the Garrison, George Mountain Odell M.D., son of the late Hon. W.F. Odell of Fredericton, N.B., to Elizabeth Ludlow, daughter of D.L. Robinson, an uncle of Deputy Commissary General Robinson.

Dr. G.M. Odell married, secondly, Susan Philipse, daughter of Morris Robinson. She was a cousin of the Honourable F.P. Robinson. In 1865, Mrs. George Lee bequeathed to Susan P. Odell, her niece, wife of Dr. George M. Odell, £100, “also her work table and sofa table,” and a portrait of her father Morris Robinson. There is no inscription here in memory of Dr. Odell’s second wife.

New Brunswick Reporter, Fredericton, NB, 27 April 1892:

Intelligence of the death of Dr. Geo. M. Odell at Newport, R.I. last week was heard with sorrow by many of the old families in Fredericton whose physician and friend the deceased had been. Dr. Odell was for many years a leading physician here. His remains were brought to this city Monday and interred in the family enclosure in the old cemetery. The chief mourners were Capt. Odell, nephew of the deceased; Delancy Robinson, F.A.H. Straton and Geo. C. Hunt. Closely following these were all of the city physicians. The pall bearers were Sir John Allen, Judge Fraser, Lt. Col. Maunsell, Andrew Inches, E.H. Wilmot and J. Henry Phair. Capt. Odell was at the bedside for a couple of days before he died and accompanied the remains to the city. Rev. G.G. Roberts performed the last rites at the grave.

Charles Odell, born 16 August 1826, was twice married, first to Maynard Eliza Grange (born 1835) by whom he had two children, Florence Mary and George Grange. In 1867, Charles married, secondly, Sarah, daughter of John D. Kinnear, Judge of Probate for Cumberland County, Nova Scotia. They had five children. His eldest son, George Grange Odell, often visited his father from South America where he worked as an engineer. It is remembered that one of his parrots hid in the Cathedral and disrupted a Sunday service.

Their house, occupied for a hundred years or more by the Odell family, is now the Deanery. It is shown in the first town plat, the plan of which was made by Lieut. Dugald Campbell. Above each of the two upper rooms was a loft or sleeping quarter, entirely separate. The large iron rings bolted into the woodwork were probably placed there to chain deserters during one of the early periods of the movement of troops through Fredericton. Until 1844, this house with gardens, yards, stables, outhouses, together with land in rear, extended to Charlotte Street.

Francis Straton and family

Straton

The Straton family lot contained eight stones, a broken base, and a footstone. The eight stones have been replaced by a large new stone. A marker in the shape of a cross, inscribed “Minnie” and “Frank,” also stands in this lot.

In memory of Sarah Jane Straton, born 1817 died 1864, aged 47 years.

Royal Gazette, Fredericton, NB, 12 November 1842:

Married on Monday the 31st ultimo, in Christ Church, Fredericton, by the Venerable Archdeacon, Francis A.H. Straton, Barrister-at-Law, to Sarah Jane, eldest daughter of the late George P. Bliss.

Francis A.H. Straton was a grandson of Lieut. James Straton. He was appointed Clerk of the Executive Council on 30 May 1856 and remained in office until his death. He was also a senior partner, with J. Henry Phair, of the law firm of Straton and Phair. The Phair and Straton families were connected by marriage.

Francis Straton married Sarah Jane Bliss in 1842. They lived with her widowed mother and numerous family members in Brunswick Street for many years. He moved his family to another house, 736 Brunswick Street, a few months before Sarah’s death. There were ten children by this marriage.

In memory of “Minnie” who died at the age of nine years, and “Frank” who died aged two years. ‘Not dead but sleeping.’

According to the Cathedral records of 1860, “Minnie” was Mary Harriet Rebecca Straton. “IHS,” a stone in memory of Andrew William “Andy” Straton, was erected by his cousin and friend Bliss Carman. Andrew Straton died a young man. There is also a footstone inscribed “A.W.S.”

In memory of Barry Straton, died October 10, 1901, aged 47 years.

Barry Straton was a lawyer but did not practice. Not as well known as his cousins, Bliss Carman and Charles G.D. Roberts, he wrote poetry of exceptional merit. He lived all his life with his grandmama in the oldest and original part of the large house in Brunswick Street upon what was once the John Murray Bliss grant. He never spoke to his stepmother, Augusta, who lived in an addition to the home. He died in Maugerville. For over sixty years this house at 736 Brunswick Street was known as Straton Manor and remains so today.

Sacred to the memory of John M. Straton, first mate of the Barque GENII.

Morning Telegraph, Saint John, NB, 7 October 1869:

Perhaps one of the most appalling disasters which the storm of Monday night brought about is the loss of the new barque “Genii”, 500 ton Register at New River… She sailed in ballast from St. Andrews on Friday last and arrived at New River on Saturday morn. to load deals for Liverpool under charter of J.E. Knight, Esq., lessee of the mills of Messrs. Prescott & Lawrence at that place. There were some 60,000 feet of deals rafted and ready to be put on board on Monday. The raft being completed, it was placed under the lee of the breakwater which, it was thought, would offer it ample security from the effects of the coming storm. The pilot of the ship, Capt. James Clarke of St. Andrews, had been put ashore and it was intended that he should be taken on board ship again toward night. The Stevedores, George and Peter McVicker had come from Mascarene bringing their crew, six in number, with them, and thus all, except the Pilot were on board when night came on. The following are the names of the men who were lost: Charles Bayley of Westport, Brier Island, Capt.; John M. Straton of Fredericton, Mate…

The eldest son of Francis A.H. Straton, was a victim of the disastrous Saxby Gale that occurred in the 26th year of his age. Jack Straton perished on 4 October 1869 and his remains were returned to Fredericton. He was buried with “Masonic and military honours” from his father’s Brunswick Street home. Old schoolmates and friends erected a stone in token of their respect and esteem. A small base is all that remains, and a footstone inscribed “JMS.”

In memory of James Murray Straton.

James Murray Straton was gazetted Second Lieutenant, New Brunswick Artillery, 14 April 1863, according to the New Brunswick Journals militia list of 1867. He was buried from the Cathedral on 9 October 1869, at the age of 25.

In memory of Francis A.H. Straton, died June 16, 1900, aged 88 years and his second wife Augusta, died February 23, 1906, aged 76. Their daughter Mary Isabella Straton died Dec. 28, 1956 aged 86 years.

In July 1866, Francis A.H. Straton married, secondly, Augusta, daughter of Benjamin L. Peters. For his second marriage, F.A.H. Straton had a house built adjoining the family homestead. They had two children. Their son, Brooke, is buried at Rumford, Maine. Their daughter, Mary I. (“May”), was blind. She died at the home of Walter P. Fenety, where she had resided for more than fifty years, and is buried in the family plot.

McInnes and McBeath

McInnes

Miss R.M. McInnes claims a lot on the 3rd path from Allen Street in the new part. Bounded on the north by the Joseph Fleming lot, on the other three sides by walks, it being a corner, enclosed by granite posts, iron rods and chains. Marked by monuments to William McBeath, Sarah Moffat and others.

Two stones are enclosed by iron railings and chains with joining posts.

Sacred to the memory of Henry McPherson McBeath who departed this life 15 January, 1841, aged 19 months. Also Mary Allison McBeath who died 26th August, 1841, aged 25 days. Jesus said, "Suffer little children to come unto me and forbid them not for such is the Kingdom of God."

William McBeath born April 30, 1800, died June 30, 1882, and Sarah Moffat, wife of William McBeath died November 26th, 1875.

Footstones: "H.McP.B." and "M.A.MCB."

William McBeath was a prominent member of the Kirk, and the first insurance agent in Fredericton.

In memory of John McInnes, born in Argylshire, Scotland, June 1st, 1819, died Jan. 15, 1880, and his wife Jane, died 1833. Also John Campbell — John Archd. — Clara L. Alice — Jesse Campbell. Children of John and Jane McInnes.

Jane was the daughter of William and Sarah McBeath. Her husband, John McInnes, lived with the McBeaths when he came to Fredericton to take charge of the gas works. One son, Frank McInnes, was the Boston city engineer. Another son, Archibald, married Caroline, a daughter of George Babbit of Fredericton, and became a prominent engineer in New York.

Daily Telegraph, Saint John, NB, 20 January 1880:

Fredericton, Jan. 19 – The funeral of John McInnes which took place yesterday afternoon at 2 o’clock was largely attended. The pall bearers were John A. Morrison, Wm Anderson, F.A.H. Straton, Geo. F. Whelpley, Arthur Limerick and John Edwards. The remains were interred in the old burial ground.

Nathaniel Cameron, nephew of Nathaniel Cameron

Cameron

In memory of Nathaniel Cameron 1831-1919; Mary Jean, wife of Nathaniel Cameron, 1831-1897; and Mary Agnes Cameron, born July 22, 1870, died Dec. 22, 1882, 12 years, a grandchild.

Footstones: “M.A.C." and "H.L."

This lot, which contained four stones, now has one large new stone inscribed on two sides. It was claimed by Mary Jane Cameron for herself and relatives and was enclosed with stone posts and chain situate in the upper part, bounded north by Alexander Cumming’s lot and on the south by the F.A.H. Straton lot. It was marked by a large stone monument to her father and mother. It was purchased from Henry Chestnut.

Nathaniel Cameron, a butcher, was a nephew of Nathaniel Cameron (1798-1879), who had also been a butcher. His wife, Mary Jane, together with her sister, Helen Little, had a fashionable millinery shop on Queen Street. Their father, John Little, served on Fredericton Exhibition committees in the l850s.

In memory of John Little, died July 27th, 1861, aged 61 years; also his wife, Christena, died Oct. 14th, 1863, aged 66 years, and their daughter Christena, died Nov. 13th, 1837, aged 3 years. Helen Little born Jan. 28th, 1837, died May 10th, 1891, 55 years.

In 1865-66, Archibald and John Little were farmers on the Royal Road. John Little and his family came from Scotland. His wife had been married previously, and they brought her family with them. One son, Joseph Thorburn, remained in Scotland, but Robert Thorburn and a younger sister, Elizabeth, came to New Brunswick with their mother. Robert Thorburn eventually settled in Stanley and had a very large family.

In memory of Robert Ross died May 27th, 1871 aged 33 years. Also James G.T. Ross died Feb. 15th,1866, aged 24 years. Elizabeth T. Ross died Aug. 11, 1859, aged 14 years. Children of Robert and Elizabeth Ross.

Mary Ross, widow of Robert Ross, born 1772, died June 9th, 1858, aged 86 years.

Elizabeth Thorburn married Robert Ross, a fireman in Fredericton. Three of her children and her mother-in-law, Mary, are buried here. Mary Ross came from England to New Brunswick with her children. It is believed that Jessie Ross, aged 40, of Scotland, also is buried here in an unmarked grave.