Stirling and Sterling

Sterling/Stirling

Sabine’s Loyalists of the American Revolution, Vol. II:

Jonathan Stirling died at St. Mary’s, York County, New Brunswick in 1826, aged seventy-six. Ann, his widow, died at the same place in 1845, at the age of eighty-two.

Jonathan Stirling, of Maryland, was a captain in the Maryland Loyalists. In 1783 he was one of the survivors of the transport ship Martha, wrecked on the passage to Nova Scotia. He settled at Saint John, New Brunswick, and was one of the grantees of that city. He received half-pay.

New Brunswick Royal Gazette, 11 November 1826:

All persons… estate of John Stirling, late of the Parish of St. Mary’s… immediate payment to… Geo. H. Sterling, Thos. Gill, Executors.

The Sterling property had a frontage of over six hundred feet, and is referred to locally as the “Archie Sterling property.” His house was splendidly located on the river bank. That large house was destroyed by fire.

Three McLean sisters married three brothers Sterling.

A. Addison Sterling was born and brought up on this property, and was a merchant in Fredericton for some years before his appointment as sheriff of York County, in 1883. He held that position for twenty-five years.

The Sterling property extended as far as the old school, which stood partly on Sterling property for one hundred years. The education of A. Addison Sterling was continued in Fredericton, and he walked across the river ice in winter, in the cold grey early morning and equally cold twilight. A new school stands on the site of the old schoolhouse and marks the upper line of the Harding property.

It is thought that the Sterlings are buried in the Old Burial Ground.

See also The Old Burying Ground, Vol. III, p. 208.