The family of George Harding, Maugerville Loyalist

Harding

John Harding, born March 1st, 1774, died January 9th, 1866

Sarah Harding, born April 29th, 1776, died August 5th, 1858

John Harding in 1851 was a farmer and his three-storey house was the largest in St. Mary’s. He was very well off and acquired a great deal of property. In 1851 he and his wife, Sarah Barker, were living alone.

John Harding was brought to New Brunswick by his father, George Harding (c.1744-1808), Loyalist. In 1783 George Harding purchased Lot 74 in Maugerville from Samuel and Sarah Bridges, and he was listed in the Sunbury County Poll Book, 1795, with home and freehold in Maugerville. Mrs. Harding, "consort of George Harding," died in 1795.

George Harding deeded his slave Sippeo to his son John, "to be his property and his heirs and successors during the life of the said negro…." The indenture was dated 1784 and signed in 1802 by the Justice of the Peace at Maugerville, Elijah Miles. This interesting document was given to the Legislative Library, Fredericton and is framed. John Harding willed his slaves to his sister, Elizabeth, the second wife of the Loyalist Captain Elijah Miles. Sippeo became the verger of Christ Church, Maugerville.

The names George, John, and William appear frequently in the various branches of the Harding family, who came from Derry, Ireland by way of Newburgh, New York,. Another George Harding, 1770-1843, settled near Saint John and married Jane Spragg (or Sprague) at Belleisle, NB. He was the son of Capt. William Harding (1745-1818), who is buried at the Loyalist Cemetery, Saint John, and his wife, Leah Sarah Gillies. William Harding seems to have been the brother of the George Harding who settled in Maugerville.

Jonathan George Harding in 1846 was a cabinetmaker. Payments for work done while renovating the Assembly Room (Journals of the House of Assembly, 1846) included: J.G. Harding, for making tables for the Assembly Room; Thomas Armstrong, for making carpet; Thomas Aiken, cutting and laying down carpet repairing desks; T.C. Everett, stove and pipe; Thomas Stewart, coal scuttles; Spafford Barker, firearms; William Morgan, grates for the Assembly Room; and Justin Spahnn, repairing clock and care thereof.

Stevenson and MacPherson

Stevenson

William Stevenson, b. June 15, 1800, d. Mar. 21, 1872. Mary, his wife, b. June 17, 1797, d. Jan. 7, 1860.

James D. MacPherson, born Oct. 15, 1824, died Jan. 29, 1888.

These inscriptions are on either side of a substantial stone.

William Stevenson was a grocer, Queen and Phoenix Square, according to the New Brunswick Directory for 1865-66.

James MacPherson was a harness maker. Samuel D. McPherson advertised in the New Brunswick Directory his Saddle and Harness manufactory in Queen Street which had been established for thirty-four years. James was a son of Samuel and a member of that important business. He was a brother of Mary Stevenson, and also of Jane, Mrs. John Neill, and Elizabeth, Mrs. Justin Spahnn.

John MacPherson, son of James, was born in 1842. At the age of 11, he was a lodger in the home of his aunt, Mrs. Stevenson. In 1871, when William Stevenson retired, he was living with his nephew John and his wife Anne. John MacPherson continued the business of Stevenson’s grocery store.

John MacPherson claims a lot in the Burial ground. Size about 13 x 8 feet, situate in the New Part 3rd Sec. West. Bounded north by William Needham’s lot, south by the Agnew lot, East and West by walks Said lot extending between them. Not enclosed but marked by a monument to claimer’s Aunt, Mary Stevenson. This lot was first purchased by the late William Stevenson, who at his death willed it to the above claimant.

Alexander McCausland and family

McCausland

Lot #134. This lot, about 12 feet square, was enclosed by a massive granite curbing with higher granite posts. It is bounded on the north by the Hunt/Smithson lot and south by the lot of Henry Torrens. It contains four handsome white marble memorials and two large white marble footstones. The inscriptions on the four sides of one monument read "Alexander McCausland," "Susannah," "Albert," and "Amelia."

In memory of Alexander McCausland, died 12th December, 1868, in the 67th year of his age. Also his wife, Margery, died 8th September, 1836 ae 27 years and Mary, their daughter, died 10th Dec. 1834 ae 4 years.

Amelia Jane McCausland, 1847-1936. "He giveth his beloved sleep."

In memory of Albert McCausland, died 28th July 1865 ae 35 years. Also his wife Susan died 12 Aug. 1860, ae 22 years.

Susannah Hendry, second wife of Alexander McCausland, died 10th Jan. 1904 ae 88 years.

Franklin A. McCausland, born May 20, 1849, d. Dec. 31, 1926.

In memory of John McCausland, died 14th Sept 1860 ae 38 years. A son of Alexander and Margery.

In memory of Eva, wife of Charles A. McCausland, died Oct. 10th, 1880 ae 26 years.

In memory of Minnie Maude, daughter of James and Ellen McCausland, died July 30th, 1868 ae 18 months.

In memory of Catherine Lyons, wife of Frederick J. Doherty, died Oct. 9th, 1901, aged 70 years.

Footstones: "Father, A.McC." and "Mother, S.McC."

Alexander McCausland and John Torrens in 1846 were school teachers. The former went into business with Thomas Simmonds, a leather cutter. The firm advertised in 1852 as SIMMONDS & McCAUSLAND. In 1870, McCausland and Sons advertised in the Colonial Farmer: "A. McCausland and Sons, Leather and shoe findings, McCausland Building, corner Queen St. and Phoenix Square." Alexander McCausland was in the loyal ministry of the Methodist Church in connection with the Fredericton circuit for thirty years and a member for fifty years.

The second wife of Alexander McCausland was Susannah Hendry. The Hendry family lived at MacDonald’s Point.

The census, 1861, Fredericton, lists Alexander McCausland, 59, Ireland, Tanner, Methodist; his wife, Susannah, 56; James, 27; Amelia, 13; and Franklin, 11. James, the youngest son by his first wife, Margery, was reputed to be a fine amateur actor and worked in his father’s business. Another son by his first wife, Albert W. McCausland, a widower, was boarding with Hubbard Williams. Albert McCausland was a watchmaker and jeweller. At the age of 16 he had lived with his uncle, Justin Spahnn, as an apprentice.

In the 1861 census is an entry for Lucretia McCausland, widow, 31, Methodist, and her children: Anna, 10; Charles, 8; Ella, 7; and George H., aged 5. Also in that household was Catherine “Kate” Lyons, a cousin of Lucretia, 28, born in Ireland.

Lucretia was the widow of John, son of Alexander and Margery McCausland. She married, secondly, Thomas Gilmour of Saint John, a merchant. Her young family went with her to Saint John, but Charles, her eldest son, became a watchmaker in Fredericton like his uncle Albert McCausland. Charles was famous locally for his astronomical clock.

In 1878, Charles McCausland and other heirs of the estate sold their corner of Phoenix Square to A.F. Randolph, who built on this lot an outstanding wholesale business.