The family of Edward Yardy, King’s Printer

Yardy

Sacred to the memory of Mary Yardy, died April 11, 1871, aged 83 years. "Though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death I will fear no evil for Thou art with me. Thy rod and Thy staff will comfort me."

William Yardy died Dec. 25 1863, aged 85 years.

Sacred to the memory of Edward Yardy, died Aug. 24, 1901, aged 89 years. "Blessed are the pure in heart for they shall see God.

Sacred to the memory of Catherine, wife of Edward Yardy, died Nov. 25 1883, aged 66 years. "Her children rise up and call her blessed."

Mary Ellen d. of Edward and Catherine died Aug. 30, 1843, ae 3 months.

Separate headstones. This plot was purchased by Edward Yardy from Henry Chestnut.

Edward Yardy, born 1814, came to Fredericton from Ireland with his parents, Mary and William, in 1821. He was a printer in the office of the King’s Printer. Edward Yardy was married in 1841 to Catherine Smith. The family home was on St. John Street, adjacent to the site of the Farrell brick house. Edward Yardy’s parents lived with their son.

Edward and Catherine Yard’s fourth daughter, Julia Alice, married Charles Victor Twiss of Boston in 1874.  Another daughter married Charles Archibald Welsh (or Welch) who was the son of carpenter Anthony Welch, for some time verger of the Parish Church, Fredericton.

Fredericton Evening Capital, Fredericton, NB, 16 October 1884:

Edward Yardy’s connection with the printing business in this Province extends over a period of 65 years. He entered the office of the ‘Star’ published in Saint John city by Mr. Younghusband and subsequently went with Mr. Seeds & Cameron who took the ‘Star’ and afterwards published the ‘Observer’. In 1837, he went to Fredericton and entered the ‘Royal Gazette’ office, then published by the late Mr. Simpson. Mr. Yardy was foreman of the Gazette for a number of years. Mr. Yardy and his two daughters with his son, who had come from Boston to accompany them to their new home, left this morn. for that city.

New Brunswick Reporter and Fredericton Advertiser, Fredericton, NB, 5 September 1885:

Death of a Fredericton boy – Intelligence has been received of the death of C. Archie WELSH at his home in Beverly near Boston, Mass. The cause of his death was heart disease. His wife was the daughter of Edward YARDY, lately of this city. The Boston ‘Post’ says that he constructed some of the finest buildings in Boston among them being the New Old South Church, the palatial residence of Martin Brimmer, the Art Museum and the St. John’s Memorial Church, Cambridge. He was 53 years old and leaves a widow and son.

Carleton Sentinel, Woodstock, NB, 11 July 1896:

Edward Yardy, Boston, Mass. is visiting his daughter Mrs. W.H. Everett of this town. He is accompanied by his daughter, Susie Yardy. Mr. Yardy was be remembered as the veteran printer, who was foreman of the ‘Royal Gazette’, Fredericton for over half a century. He is now in his 88th [?] year, but is hale and hearty.

John Simpson, Queen’s Printer: first Mayor of Fredericton

Simpson

Sacred to the memory of John Simpson, born in Aberdeen, Scotland, 14th March 1795, died 22nd February, 1863, aged 68 years. "I HAVE WAITED FOR THY INTENTION O LORD." Also Rebecca Coy his wife died April 10th, 1844, aged 40 years.

John Duncan Simpson 1840-1841.

Julia Black, beloved wife of W.A. Balloch and daughter of John and Rebecca Simpson, died April 13th, 1876 aged 40 years.

This tall monument stands alone in a lot once surrounded by a cast iron fence with a gate on the north side facing Brunswick Street.

John Simpson came to New Brunswick in 1815 and established himself as a merchant. On 30 November 1825, John Simpson and other Scots of the capital formed the Fredericton Society of St. Andrews, to which he gave many years of service from 1825 until 1853 as Secretary, 1st Vice President, and President.

In 1829 he was appointed Queen’s Printer and remained in that position until his death in 1863. In 1851 he entered into an agreement with Edward Yardy and Charles S. Lugrin to print the Royal Gazette and attend to the routine business of the Gazette office. It was published from a small building that stood just above his home at 776 King Street.

John Simpson was director of the Bank of British North America and had been President of the Central Bank of New Brunswick. He was Vice-President of the Fredericton Auxiliary Bible Society in 1840 and assisted the Ladies’ Benevolent Society in 1845. In 1847, the Legislature incorporated the Fredericton Gas Company, and John Simpson was appointed a director.

When the City of Fredericton was incorporated in 1848, John Simpson became Fredericton’s first Mayor. He was reappointed and remained in that office for five years until his appointment on 23 June 1853 as Justice of the Inferior Court of Common Pleas. Mayor Simpson and his Council became responsible for law and order. The Mayor was Chief Magistrate, and by 1851 a police force was appointed. He served on the Committee of the newly formed Dispensary to provide medical assistance to the poor. It was while he was Mayor that the Council let a contract to build a market house.

John Simpson’s first marriage, 23 February 1825, was to Rebecca Bunnell Coy, second daughter of Amasa Coy and his first wife, Elizabeth Holly. Amasa Coy, a pre-Loyalist settler of Maugerville, had moved to Fredericton where he opened a private bank and became one of the promoters of the Bank of New Brunswick.

John and Rebecca Simpson had a large family: the eldest, John Wesley, born 21 December 1825, died 8 February 1828. Mary Elizabeth, born 1829, married Rev. John Lathern, formerly of Alston, England, at the Wesleyan Chapel in Fredericton on 20 July 1859. He was Minister of the Exmouth Street Chapel, Saint John. Sarah Louise, born 10 September 1831, died 13 October 1834. Catherine Garden, born 1834, married Oliver Jones, of Moncton, at Saint Anne’s Chapel in Fredericton. Isabella Browning, born 1835, married William J. M. Hanington, eldest son of the Hon. D. Hanington, late Speaker of the House, on 29 October 1856, at the Cathedral. Both died sometime before 1886, leaving five children. Joseph Gugnor, born 1835, moved to Huron, Michigan. Julia Black, born 1836, married W.A. Balloch, a dentist. She died in the Saint John Mental Asylum and is buried here. John Sinclair was born in 1840. John Duncan, also born in 1840, died 12 February 1841 at the age of 6 months and 13 days. He is buried here. Emma Colebrook was born close to the time of her mother’s death. Baptismal records give her as Emma Rebecca, but her father’s will names her as Emma Colebrook. She married Rev. Thomas Neales, Woodstock, on 27 October 1868.

On 7 January 1845, John Simpson married, secondly, Alicia Wallace of Saint John at the Centenary Chapel. She was of Irish descent. She died in Saint John, 22 March 1886, twenty-three years after the death of her husband, and was interred here in an unmarked grave. Although there were no children from this union, she was a loving and caring stepmother.

John Simpson died 22 February 1863, at his Fredericton home. Prior to his death, "he had frequently intimated that he was drawing near his end and, in his last moments, when he felt the hand of death was upon him, hopefully, peacefully, triumphantly, he exclaimed ‘all’s well’ and fell asleep in Jesus." A cross of St. Andrew marks his grave.

Royal Gazette, Fredericton, NB, 25 February 1863:

On Sunday evening last at 7 o’clock, February 22, 1863. John Simpson, Esquire, Queen’s Printer, for nearly 34 years Proprietor and Publisher of this paper, died at his residence in this city, aged 68 years.

"This event has deprived the community of one of its most valuable citizens. The poor — the widow — and the fatherless, have lost a kind and generous friend — his widow, a devoted partner — his family a loving and affectionate Parent — the Public a faithful officer, — and his Staff of Workmen and Apprentices, an Employer and a Master beloved by them all. In all the varied offices he has been called to fill, he has performed his duty to the best of his ability, and with a ready mind." …Whether as Captain of a volunteer Company, Mayor of the City, Justice of the Court of Common Pleas, or Queen’s Printer, his constant aim was to do his duty and do it well… the Volumes of Province Laws, the Legislative Journals, and all other work executed at his office will show, — as they can compare most favourably with the same kind of work in any part of the Empire. He united himself with the Wesleyan Church before he left his native country and has always been a liberal contributor towards its support in this city."

Asa Coy and son, druggists: “Leeches, Leeches, Leeches”

Coy

In Memory of

Mary Ann Coy

Asa Coy

Sarah Coy

Holly Coy

This stone is engraved with "Dear Father and Mother 1885" on the face and one name on each side of its base. The lot was once enclosed by an iron fence with stone posts.

Mollie died July 16, 1876, ae 5 months.

Mollie was a granddaughter of Asa Coy, a child of his daughter Sarah who married J. Henry Phair.

Asa Coy was born in Gagetown in 1799, son of Amasa Coy (1757-1838) and his first wife Elizabeth Holly. He came to Fredericton from Maugerville with his father and was brought up in Fredericton, where he lived out his days. He had two sisters, Sarah Smith and Rebecca Bunnell Simpson, and two stepbrothers, John S. Coy (born 1812) and Amasa P. Coy (born 1815).

Royal Gazette, Fredericton, NB, 3 August 1824:

Married by the Rev. George Best, Thomas B. Smith, of Burton, to Sarah, eldest daughter of Mr. Amasa Coy.

Asa married Mary Ann (1805 – 1884) in Fredericton on 29 March 1825, the daughter of Jarvis Ring (born 1781) and his wife, Sarah Hartt of Canning. Asa Coy was a licensed auctioneer and prosperous. The Coy block, where the family lived above the shop, is on the southeast corner of Queen and Regent Streets. The family was Calvinist Baptist, like all early Maugerville settlers. A portrait of Asa and Mary Ann Coy is in the York-Sunbury Historical Society Museum.

In 1836, Asa Coy was Vice President of the Union Fire Club. In 1837 he was treasurer of the New Brunswick Baptist Education Society. In 1838, he founded the Bank of Fredericton, of which he was President. In the general election of 1843, Asa Coy was a candidate in York County but was defeated. In 1847, he set up his son, Asa Holly, as a druggist. "LEECHES LEECHES LEECHES — Asa Coy and Son Druggists," read the sign. Asa Coy was the paymaster of the New Brunswick Yeomanry Cavalry for many years, appointed in 1849. In 1850 he was appointed Receiver of Crown Debts and later Secretary of the Board of Works.

The children of Asa and Mary Ann Coy were Asa Holly (born 25 May 1827), Caroline Ring (born 6 May 1829), Sarah Elizabeth (b. 22 March 1831), Mary Ann (born 1 November 1832), Fanny Rebecca (born 29 April 1835), Harriet Amelia (born 12 September 1837), Fanny Rebecca Simpson (born 14 January 1840), George Frederick (born 9 January 1844), and Amasa Simpson (born 19 April 1846).

Three daughters of Asa Coy died in infancy. It is not known where these children are buried.

Royal Gazette, Fredericton, NB, 16 March 1836:

Died on Monday morning last, Frances Rebecca, infant daughter of Mr. Asa Coy, aged 10 months.

Royal Gazette, Fredericton, NB, 25 October 1848:

Died on the 12th instant, 1848, Harriet Amelia, fourth daughter of Asa Coy, Esq. aged 11 years and 1 month. Remarkable from her earliest childhood for her gentleness, amiability and thoughtfulness of disposition, she exhibited in the severe and protracted illness that preceded her death. Also, on the 25th instant Fanny Rebecca, fifth daughter of Asa Coy, ae 8 years and nine months.

Asa Coy’s eldest daughter, Caroline Ring, married Levi Waterhouse, Saint John, and they had one child, Ann. Mary Ann married William Watts, florist, Fredericton, who very comfortably provided for her.

Royal Gazette, Fredericton, NB, 29 October 1851:

Married at Saint John, on Thursday Morning last, in Trinity Church, by the Reverend Alexander Stewart, Mr. A.H. Coy, Druggist of Fredericton, to Mary Elizabeth, eldest daughter of Stephen K. Foster, Esquire of that City.

Morning News, Saint John, NB, 13 March 1850:

Married, at the Cathedral Church, Fredericton, on Wednesday, the 6th inst. by the Venerable the Archdeacon [Coster], J. Henry Phair, Esq. to Sarah Elizabeth, second daughter of Asa Coy, Esq., of the City.

This marriage proved not to be a happy one.

In 1861, Asa and Mary Ann Coy had their daughter Sarah Phair living with them and their grandson, Edwin, age 10. Asa Coy was then Secretary of the Board of Works, Queen and Regent Streets., and his son, Asa Holly Coy, was clerk of the Board of Works.

Asa Coy died in 1874.

J. Henry Phair as agent for his wife and Mrs. Caroline Waterhouse claims this lot enclosed with iron and post chains, marked by a monument to the late Asa Coy. This lot was formerly purchased from Henry Chestnut.

J. Henry Phair was a barrister and Fishery Commissioner. He was a keen sportsman, of an artistic nature, very personable. He several times went on fishing trips in New Brunswick with Teddy Roosevelt, President of the United States, of whom he was a great admirer. In 1891, J. Henry Phair was appointed Clerk of the Legislative Council. This Council met for the last time in 1892 but the salary of the Clerk continued for his lifetime.

Asa Coy, 31 March 1846 — “My Grandfather’s Family on my Father’s Side":

Sarah — Mrs. Plummer, first child. Died several years ago at the Nashwaak leaving several children and a numerous progeny of grandchildren.

Amasa — Born in Connecticut then a British colony, 24 July 1757. Married at Gagetown, 1797 or 1798 to Elizabeth Holly. Three children Asa, Sarah Smith and Rebecca Simpson. Married the Widow Smith in Burton in ? Two children, Johnny and Amasa, who died in Burton. Amasa and Elizabeth Holly were my parents. He died at Fredericton July 18, 1838.

Asa — Third child. Died before marriage, smallpox.

Edward — Still alive, lives in Canning, Queen’s County. Several children

Hannah — Mrs. Cromwell, died four or five years ago at Burton. Four children. She was the first English girl born on the St. John River

John — died many years ago at the Nashwaak. Several children

Rebecca — Mrs. Bunnell. Died in Fredericton 1846. Left no issue.

Levine — Mrs. Turney. Died several years ago at Swan Creek. Left several children

Mary — Mrs. Morris now Mrs. Bradley. Never had any children.

David — lives at Gagetown. Several children

Benjamin — Also lives at Gagetown. Several Children. Is an ordained minister in connection with the Baptist Association of this Province.

Thomas Sampson, Charles Sampson, and Turner’s Express

Sampson

Thomas Sampson 1807-1854

Jane Sampson 1819-1900

James Henry 1843-1846

Jane 1841-1915

Children of Thomas and Jane Sampson

Thomas Sampson came from England in 1830 with his wife and a baby. His wife died upon arrival, and he was remarried to Jane Johnson, who was Irish. He was a tinsmith and a printer.

Saint John, NB, 23 January 1854:

Deaths at Fredericton on the 17th inst. Mr. Thomas Sampson, aged 49 years, formerly of Devonshire, England.

The census for 1861 shows the widow Jane Sampson, 43, living with her children Thomas, 22, printer; Charles, 21; Jane, 19; John, 15; and William, 13. Hutchinson’s New Brunswick Directory for 1865-1866 lists Jane Sampson, widow of Thomas, and her two eldest sons located at Carleton near King Street. Thomas was a printer and Charles A. was an agent for Turner’s Express. Mary, Thomas Sampson’s daughter by his first wife, married John Harrison in 1859 at Portland, Maine.

New Brunswick Directory for 1865-66:

Turner’s American Express, Charles A. Sampson, Agent, Queen Street forwards packages and parcels of goods and money, goods purchased, notes, drafts and bills collected, Fredericton, St. John, Halifax, Boston, New York.

Turner’s Express was an active company, with agents in towns throughout the province. The elder Sampson may also have been connected with the business. In 1833 the schedule was Fredericton to Saint John, stopping overnight en route, proceeding the next day to Eastport, this part of the journey by stage. The following day at noon a sailing ship left Eastport for Boston, a trip that usually took two and a half days. This was speedier and more pleasant than going all the way by stage, which took eleven days.

The Gleaner, Fredericton, NB, 25 October, 1895:

Thomas Sampson, formerly of this city, but for some time back employed on the staff of a daily newspaper in Norwich, Conn., is in Fredericton on a visit. This is his first visit during 27 years. Mr. Sampson served his apprenticeship to the Art Preservative with the late John Simpson, Queen’s Printer in the Royal Gazette office. He is a brother of C.A. Sampson, Secretary of the Board of School Trustees. In his first stroll down Queen Street in 27 years, accompanied by his sister, he received quite an ovation from numerous old friends. About 1866 Mr. Sampson was an active member of the old Victoria Rifles (Capt. Simonds) of this city, as well as the old No. 1 engine company (Capt. John Moore) at present our esteemed city treasurer.

Jane, the widow of Thomas Sampson, is remembered as residing in Carleton Street with her unmarried daughter, “Jenny.” The family was prominent in the work of the Wilmot Church, and Charles Sampson was for many years Secretary of the Fredericton School Board.