Abraham Henry Clark, builder

Clark

In memory of A. Henry Clark, died in Fredericton, July 11th, 1865 aged 56 years and his wife Christianna, died Feb. 5th, 1887 age 79 years.

Also their son Edwin B. who died at Jacksonville, Florida, April 4, 1871 in the 27th year of his age.

Footstones: “Mother” and “Father.”

Lot #44, 10 x 12 feet, was purchased in 1866 and contains one large stone inscribed on two sides. The engraved symbol on the top of Edwin Clark’s epitaph is an anchor and rope. There were five graves here enclosed by wooden paling painted black. Besides the graves of A. Henry Clark and his wife and son, there are two unmarked graves: Louisa Augusta, born 1 December 1837, died 22 August 1918; and George Samuel Clark, born 7 May 1846, died 12 December 1922.

Abraham Henry Clark, born 19 May 1807, was the eldest son of Samuel Clark and his wife Abigail Jewett. He was born on the farm at Keswick Ridge and became a house builder in Fredericton and was one of the best.

He married, on 7 May 1835, Christianna ("Ann") Bain, born 6 August 1808. This marriage was one of the first performed under the new law which permitted dissenting clergymen in New Brunswick to perform the marriage ceremony. Christianna Bain was of Scottish descent and a devout Christian. Prior to her death she was an invalid for some years.

Henry Clark brought his bride to a large house which he bought and improved — the King Street property of Thomas Everett. He subsequently built two houses in George Street.

The children of Henry and Christianna were Henry Bradford (1836-1921), Louisa Augusta (1837-1918), Charles Frederick (1841-1927), Edwin B. (1845-1871), and George Samuel (1846-1922).

Henry Bradford, the eldest son, a builder like his father, married Hannah Barker, daughter of Andrew Ritchie, also a noted builder of houses. She was a granddaughter of William Anderson, High Sheriff of York County (1801-1811), a noted Loyalist and a trader. His father, John Anderson, long connected with Nova Scotia as a trader and once a rival of Hazen, Simonds & White, bequeathed to his son William Anderson the 10,000-acre Monckton Grant and a tremendous debt. Henry Bradford Clark built the house in George Street, now numbered 759, in which he and his wife first resided and reared a family.

Miss Louisa Augusta and her youngest brother, George, remained unmarried and resided together for many years in one of the houses built by their father on George Street opposite the Old Burying Ground. George was employed by the Fred Edgecombe company for years as manager of one of the departments in the store.

Descendants of Jacob Segee

Segee

William V. Segee, born 8th June 1801, died 6th October 1875.

George N. Segee, born 5th January 1818, died 10th October 1865.

Little George, born 26th April 1864, died 26 August 1865.

Lucy Ann Roberts Creighton, wife of George N. Segee, born 20th April 1829, died 19th January 1920.

Sarah E. Segee, born 10th May 1813, died 2nd July 1870.

One tall stone in a lot once enclosed by a wrought iron fence. Only the east portion now remains.

Jacob Segee of the Loyal American Regiment came to New Brunswick in 1783 with his wife Mercy and their sons John, William, Joseph, and James who became a steamboat captain on the St. John River.

William Vincent, George N., and Sarah E. were children of Captain James Segee and his wife, Sarah G. Noble. George N. was the father of Mrs. James Lemont of this city who died in August 1954. Sarah Elizabeth was the grandmother of the late Frederick A. Payne of Lincoln, she having been the first wife of Andrew Payne; her son, Robert Payne, married Amanda Glasier. Mary Ann Segee, another sister, was the mother of the Honourable A.G. Blair.

William Segee (1767-1840), brother of Captain James Segee, lived on and owned what was formerly the Edward Simonds [or Symonds] farm near the present site of the Agricultural Research Station in Lincoln. He conducted quite a large business in pine timber and ship-building, and the place was called Segee’s Bluff.

His death is recorded in the Sentinel and Advertiser, published every Saturday by Edward Ward, Office Phoenix or Tank House, Fredericton, NB:

At his residence, on the 4th inst., Mr. William Segee, age 73 years deeply lamented by a large circle of friends. Mr. Segee was one of the United Empire Loyalists who came here with his father, Jacob Segee, in 1783, and from that period until the day of his death sustained an unblemished character which endeared him to all who knew him.

See also The Old Burying Ground, Vol. I, p. 291.

Thomas Sampson, Charles Sampson, and Turner’s Express

Sampson

Thomas Sampson 1807-1854

Jane Sampson 1819-1900

James Henry 1843-1846

Jane 1841-1915

Children of Thomas and Jane Sampson

Thomas Sampson came from England in 1830 with his wife and a baby. His wife died upon arrival, and he was remarried to Jane Johnson, who was Irish. He was a tinsmith and a printer.

Saint John, NB, 23 January 1854:

Deaths at Fredericton on the 17th inst. Mr. Thomas Sampson, aged 49 years, formerly of Devonshire, England.

The census for 1861 shows the widow Jane Sampson, 43, living with her children Thomas, 22, printer; Charles, 21; Jane, 19; John, 15; and William, 13. Hutchinson’s New Brunswick Directory for 1865-1866 lists Jane Sampson, widow of Thomas, and her two eldest sons located at Carleton near King Street. Thomas was a printer and Charles A. was an agent for Turner’s Express. Mary, Thomas Sampson’s daughter by his first wife, married John Harrison in 1859 at Portland, Maine.

New Brunswick Directory for 1865-66:

Turner’s American Express, Charles A. Sampson, Agent, Queen Street forwards packages and parcels of goods and money, goods purchased, notes, drafts and bills collected, Fredericton, St. John, Halifax, Boston, New York.

Turner’s Express was an active company, with agents in towns throughout the province. The elder Sampson may also have been connected with the business. In 1833 the schedule was Fredericton to Saint John, stopping overnight en route, proceeding the next day to Eastport, this part of the journey by stage. The following day at noon a sailing ship left Eastport for Boston, a trip that usually took two and a half days. This was speedier and more pleasant than going all the way by stage, which took eleven days.

The Gleaner, Fredericton, NB, 25 October, 1895:

Thomas Sampson, formerly of this city, but for some time back employed on the staff of a daily newspaper in Norwich, Conn., is in Fredericton on a visit. This is his first visit during 27 years. Mr. Sampson served his apprenticeship to the Art Preservative with the late John Simpson, Queen’s Printer in the Royal Gazette office. He is a brother of C.A. Sampson, Secretary of the Board of School Trustees. In his first stroll down Queen Street in 27 years, accompanied by his sister, he received quite an ovation from numerous old friends. About 1866 Mr. Sampson was an active member of the old Victoria Rifles (Capt. Simonds) of this city, as well as the old No. 1 engine company (Capt. John Moore) at present our esteemed city treasurer.

Jane, the widow of Thomas Sampson, is remembered as residing in Carleton Street with her unmarried daughter, “Jenny.” The family was prominent in the work of the Wilmot Church, and Charles Sampson was for many years Secretary of the Fredericton School Board.