Alexander McCausland and family

McCausland

Lot #134. This lot, about 12 feet square, was enclosed by a massive granite curbing with higher granite posts. It is bounded on the north by the Hunt/Smithson lot and south by the lot of Henry Torrens. It contains four handsome white marble memorials and two large white marble footstones. The inscriptions on the four sides of one monument read "Alexander McCausland," "Susannah," "Albert," and "Amelia."

In memory of Alexander McCausland, died 12th December, 1868, in the 67th year of his age. Also his wife, Margery, died 8th September, 1836 ae 27 years and Mary, their daughter, died 10th Dec. 1834 ae 4 years.

Amelia Jane McCausland, 1847-1936. "He giveth his beloved sleep."

In memory of Albert McCausland, died 28th July 1865 ae 35 years. Also his wife Susan died 12 Aug. 1860, ae 22 years.

Susannah Hendry, second wife of Alexander McCausland, died 10th Jan. 1904 ae 88 years.

Franklin A. McCausland, born May 20, 1849, d. Dec. 31, 1926.

In memory of John McCausland, died 14th Sept 1860 ae 38 years. A son of Alexander and Margery.

In memory of Eva, wife of Charles A. McCausland, died Oct. 10th, 1880 ae 26 years.

In memory of Minnie Maude, daughter of James and Ellen McCausland, died July 30th, 1868 ae 18 months.

In memory of Catherine Lyons, wife of Frederick J. Doherty, died Oct. 9th, 1901, aged 70 years.

Footstones: "Father, A.McC." and "Mother, S.McC."

Alexander McCausland and John Torrens in 1846 were school teachers. The former went into business with Thomas Simmonds, a leather cutter. The firm advertised in 1852 as SIMMONDS & McCAUSLAND. In 1870, McCausland and Sons advertised in the Colonial Farmer: "A. McCausland and Sons, Leather and shoe findings, McCausland Building, corner Queen St. and Phoenix Square." Alexander McCausland was in the loyal ministry of the Methodist Church in connection with the Fredericton circuit for thirty years and a member for fifty years.

The second wife of Alexander McCausland was Susannah Hendry. The Hendry family lived at MacDonald’s Point.

The census, 1861, Fredericton, lists Alexander McCausland, 59, Ireland, Tanner, Methodist; his wife, Susannah, 56; James, 27; Amelia, 13; and Franklin, 11. James, the youngest son by his first wife, Margery, was reputed to be a fine amateur actor and worked in his father’s business. Another son by his first wife, Albert W. McCausland, a widower, was boarding with Hubbard Williams. Albert McCausland was a watchmaker and jeweller. At the age of 16 he had lived with his uncle, Justin Spahnn, as an apprentice.

In the 1861 census is an entry for Lucretia McCausland, widow, 31, Methodist, and her children: Anna, 10; Charles, 8; Ella, 7; and George H., aged 5. Also in that household was Catherine “Kate” Lyons, a cousin of Lucretia, 28, born in Ireland.

Lucretia was the widow of John, son of Alexander and Margery McCausland. She married, secondly, Thomas Gilmour of Saint John, a merchant. Her young family went with her to Saint John, but Charles, her eldest son, became a watchmaker in Fredericton like his uncle Albert McCausland. Charles was famous locally for his astronomical clock.

In 1878, Charles McCausland and other heirs of the estate sold their corner of Phoenix Square to A.F. Randolph, who built on this lot an outstanding wholesale business.