Fanny Augusta Ward

Ward

Fanny Augusta Ward, died February 13, 1866. "I know that my Redeemer liveth."

Footstone: “F.A.W.”

Lot #45 was jointly owned by the Robb and Ward families.

Fanny Augusta was born in 1835, a daughter of the Venerable Archdeacon Coster. She married Henry Ward, M.D., an Englishman thirteen years her senior. Dr. Ward was a surgeon with one of the regiments and the son of a physician, Edward Ward. Their son, Philip, was born about 1857 and a daughter, Christiana, in 1859. According to Cathedral records, Walter George Edward was baptised 7 February 1861, Arthur Charles on 4 July 1862, and Emma Mabel on 30 July 1863.

Dr. Ward was married, secondly, 7 July 1867, to Louisa Isabella, daughter of the Honourable John Ambrose Street, Attorney General of New Brunswick. Dr. Ward in 1871 had his office at the corner of St. John and Queen Streets.

Saint John Globe, Saint John, NB, 11 March 1893:

The death is announced at Bournemouth, England, Feb. 5, of Mrs. Louise L. Ward widow of Dr. Henry Ward. The lady was the d/o Hon. John Ambrose Street and is the second member of the family whose death is announced in the past few weeks. Dr. Ward was formerly in the Royal Navy. His first wife was a Miss Coster of Fredericton. He practiced for some time in Carleton (St. John) and afterwards removed to Fredericton and then went back to England.

Dr. James Robb

Robb

Lot #45 was jointly owned by the Robb and Ward families. Today there is no sign of the wooden fence which once enclosed the lot.

Sacred to the memory of James Robb, M.D., Professor of Natural Science in the University of New Brunswick, born at Stirling, Scotland, Feb. 2, 1815, died at Fredericton, N.B., April 2, 1861.

Erected by members of the Fredericton Society of St. Andrew as a token of respect for the memory of one who long and ably filled the office of their President and who was universally esteemed as a gentleman, a scholar and a benefactor to this Province.

A St. Andrew’s Cross marks this grave.

Dr. James Robb, who joined the staff of King’s College in 1837, was the first professor of Chemistry. He had studied medicine in Edinburgh University but was more interested in Natural Science. He came to New Brunswick to accept the position of lecturer in Chemistry and Natural History in King’s College. A loved and respected teacher, Robb devoted himself to the agricultural interests of the Province. He was appointed Secretary of the Provincial Board of Agriculture when it was established in 1858. His valuable collection of species is now in the New Brunswick Museum.

Dr. Robb was a surgeon, 3rd York County Militia. He was prominent in the formation, 23 April 1847, and continuance of the Fredericton Athenaeum, a scientific and literary society of which Archdeacon Coster was president. Robb was the secretary, and prepared the astronomical material for the almanac issued by the society. In 1849 he was a chosen a member of the first Council of Fredericton. It was he who designed the city’s coat-of-arms.

Dr. Jack, Dr. Robb, and Marshal d’Avray together weathered the stormy criticism of King’s College during the 1850s, until in 1859 the Act to establish the University of New Brunswick was passed. All three are buried in this graveyard, near the grave lot of John Gregory, a foremost critic. Although James Robb and John Gregory held different views as to the necessary curricula for New Brunswick youth, when James Robb was president of the St. Andrew’s Society in 1860, the first vice-president was John Gregory.

Dr. Robb’s wife, Ellen, was a daughter of the Venerable Archdeacon Coster, and she is buried here beside her husband in an unmarked grave. Their daughter Catherine E. married John Black, a barrister of Fredericton. In 1900 when Mrs. Clarke Murray of Montreal founded the Imperial Order, Daughters of the Empire, Mrs. John Black formed the first Chapter.

The family of William Brydone Jack, President of the University of New Brunswick

Jack

Sacred to the memory of Marian Ellen, wife of William Brydone Jack, D.C.L., of King’s College, Fredericton and daughter of the late Charles D.J. Peters, who died at the College, March 20, 1858, aged 33 years.

Sacred to the memory of William Brydone Jack, A.M., D.C.L., President of the University of New Brunswick from 1861 to 1885, born at Tinwald, Scotland, Nov. 23, 1819, died at Fredericton, N.B. Nov. 23, 1886.

Charles Jeffrey, aged one year. William Glendenning, aged five years. Children of William Brydone and Marian Ellen Jack. Sacred to the memory of Hurd Augustus Brydone, third son of William and Marian Ellen Jack, born Oct. 1, 1856, died July 8, 1867. Also Mary Anne Elizabeth, eldest daughter March 22, 1846, died Oct. 17, 1878. "For if we believe that Jesus died and rose again, even so them also which sleep in Jesus will God bring with Him." 1 Thes. chapt. 4, verse 44.

This tombstone stands in the centre of a large lot surrounded with a wrought-iron fence.

Mary Anne Elizabeth Jack was thrown from a high gig driven by her father and killed. The accident happened on Queen Street near St. John Street. The three little sons who lie buried here were first buried together at the college but their remains were later removed to the Old Burying Ground.

Royal Gazette, Fredericton, NB, 25 December 1844:

Married, on Thursday, the 19th, by the Venerable Archdeacon, William Brydone Jack, M.A., Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy, King’s College, Fredericton, to Marian Ellen, youngest daughter of the Hon. Charles Jeffrey Peters, H.M. Attorney General.

Royal Gazette, Fredericton, NB, 10 July 1861:

Provincial Appointments — William Brydone Jack D.C.L. to be President of the University of New Brunswick.

William Brydone Jack was the second President of the University of New Brunswick (1861-1885), having come to this university from Scotland in the autumn of 1840, and serving the college faithfully for forty-five years. In connection with the mathematical and physical studies, he installed the fine equatorial telescope, at the time the best in British North America. He was the initiator of surveying, which led to the department of engineering. Besides his administrative and scholastic ability, he was an admirable speaker. He was a strong and vigorous man, over six feet in height, and fond of open exercise, walking, gardening, curling and driving spirited horses. One of the early university maps indicates Jack’s Iris Field and Gardens.

He died in 1886, survived by his second wife, Caroline Disbrow, and their four children: William Disbrow, M.D., of Vancouver; Arthur of California; Mabel A., who married Louis B. Millidge of Saint John; and Robin E. Brydone, who was appointed Engineer of Public Works for Canada. Robin Jack lived in Vancouver and married a daughter of Frederick Fisher of Woodstock, New Brunswick.

Much credit is given to William Brydone Jack and his colleagues, Dr. Robb, who lies buried close by, and Marshall d’Avray, for the development of the University of New Brunswick. During their tenure, however, there was government criticism that college costs were out of proportion to the benefits received, that discipline was lax, and the curricula unrelated to local educational needs.

This brilliant man could have forsaken Fredericton and accepted any of the many invitations from leading world universities. He instead chose to remain in Fredericton. The last years of Jack’s life were plagued with ill health, but in the era of very small salaries and no pensions, he was forced to continue working. Eventually the university granted him a very small pension, the first of the University of New Brunswick to be so recognized. He did make one trip back to his beloved Scotland, in 1886, the year in which he died. He was elected President of the St. Andrews Society in 1832 and held that office until 1847.

Many children were baptised "Jack," in such high regard was William Brydone Jack held.

A plaque on the Old Arts Building, UNB, reads:

William Brydone Jack, 1819-1886. Born in Scotland and educated at St. Andrews, Jack came to Fredericton in 1840 as Professor of Maths, Natural Philosophy, and Astronomy at Kings College. In 1851 he built the first astronomical observatory in what is now Canada and equipped it with the best available instruments. In collaboration with Harvard University, he established the correct longitude of Fredericton and several other N.B. sites and corrected errors in the international boundary. President of the University, 1861-1865, he succeeded in establishing the young institution upon firm academic foundations. Jack put the university on a solid footing and it prospered and grew during his 24 years. But like Head, the preceding president, it was a matter of student discipline that eventually proved his undoing.

A St. Andrews Cross marks the grave of William Brydone Jack.

The Hovey and Hooper families

Hovey

“Hovey” – there is nothing else inscribed on this handsome stone. The lot is #116 and is in the name of Stephen Hovey.

Sept. 27th [1866] Elizabeth Hovey claims on behalf of her father and his family a lot in the B. Ground, formally known as the "Hooper lot." Size about 18 feet square, and adjoining the Robb lot. Enclosed by a wooden railing. This lot was first purchased by Mrs. Hooper from Henry Chestnut.

Stephen Hovey, born 1812, a son of Stephen and Harriet Sayre Hovey, is most likely buried here, as well as his wife, Eliza Jane Agnew, born 1816. They lived in Fredericton from 1830 to 1900. Stephen Hovey was a filer on Charlotte Street. According to the census, 1861, their children were James, aged 22; Jane, 19; Rebecca and Harriet, twins, 17; Mary Alice, 14; Stephen E., 12; Allan, 10; Robert, 8; Isabell, 6; Charles, 4; and Elizabeth, 2. In the 1871 census the children of the household were Isabell, 15; Charles, 13; Elizabeth, 11; and Clara, 9. In the 1881 census, Stephen J. Hovey, 63, carpenter, and his wife Jane, 59, are listed with three of their daughters: Isabell, 24, a dressmaker; Lizzie, 20; and Clara, 18.

The first of the name, Aaron Hovey, came to the lower St. John River in 1769. In 1770 he claimed a 200-acre lot in consequence of a lease to Edmund Price, the father of his wife Dorothy. In 1783, according to the Studholm Report, he was living in Gagetown in a log house, with about 10 acres cleared. He eventually settled in the Miramichi. The children of Aaron Hovey and Dorothy Price were Janet, Abigail, Dorothy, Stephen (born 1783), Mary, Aaron (born 1788), Susanna (born 1793), Edmund (born 1795), James, Moses, Jacob Barker (born 1801), Allen, Jane (born 1797), and Asenath Ann (born 1808). Four daughters of Aaron Hovey married into Price families.

Aaron Hovey died 1839 in Ludlow, New Brunswick.

Royal Gazette, Fredericton, NB, 25 December 1839:

Died at Ludlow [Southwest Miramichi], after a short illness, This truly pious and exemplary Christian was born in Massachusetts, then a British colony, in 1761. He had been a resident of the parish of Ludlow for 28 years, during the whole of which period it had been his constant practice to assemble his neighbours upon the Sabbath day for the public worship of God. Upon these occasions he confined himself to reading the scriptures, prayer and exhortations to the holiness of life. His aim was to glorify his Creator and to benefit his destitute fellow men, not to exalt himself, hence his public devotions were marked by great simplicity and primitive brevity, and his private walk and conversation by manners plain and unassuming. To a neighbourhood devoid of regular religious instruction, as in the case with the community in which he lived, such a loss cannot easily be repaired. He closed his useful and blameless life on the 30th day of November, aged 78 years. He has left 126 descendants.

The Hoveys and Hoopers were related through marriage, and many unmarked graves of the Hooper family lie here.

In 1843, N.D. Hooper was a prominent member of the Kirk when the Reverend John M. Brooke arrived. In the 1860s, Nehemiah S. Hooper had a large business of groceries, liquors, and provisions, under the County Court House.

Isabel Agnew Hovey (born 1860) married, in 1880, W. Storey Hooper whose mother had been a Hovey. They lived at 114 George Street, which house had been owned and occupied for generations by the Hooper family. Storey Hooper, insurance agent, was manager of the Fredericton Exhibition Association and in 1912 was Mayor of Fredericton. He died in 1929, and his wife in 1940.