The family of William Brydone Jack, President of the University of New Brunswick

Jack

Sacred to the memory of Marian Ellen, wife of William Brydone Jack, D.C.L., of King’s College, Fredericton and daughter of the late Charles D.J. Peters, who died at the College, March 20, 1858, aged 33 years.

Sacred to the memory of William Brydone Jack, A.M., D.C.L., President of the University of New Brunswick from 1861 to 1885, born at Tinwald, Scotland, Nov. 23, 1819, died at Fredericton, N.B. Nov. 23, 1886.

Charles Jeffrey, aged one year. William Glendenning, aged five years. Children of William Brydone and Marian Ellen Jack. Sacred to the memory of Hurd Augustus Brydone, third son of William and Marian Ellen Jack, born Oct. 1, 1856, died July 8, 1867. Also Mary Anne Elizabeth, eldest daughter March 22, 1846, died Oct. 17, 1878. "For if we believe that Jesus died and rose again, even so them also which sleep in Jesus will God bring with Him." 1 Thes. chapt. 4, verse 44.

This tombstone stands in the centre of a large lot surrounded with a wrought-iron fence.

Mary Anne Elizabeth Jack was thrown from a high gig driven by her father and killed. The accident happened on Queen Street near St. John Street. The three little sons who lie buried here were first buried together at the college but their remains were later removed to the Old Burying Ground.

Royal Gazette, Fredericton, NB, 25 December 1844:

Married, on Thursday, the 19th, by the Venerable Archdeacon, William Brydone Jack, M.A., Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy, King’s College, Fredericton, to Marian Ellen, youngest daughter of the Hon. Charles Jeffrey Peters, H.M. Attorney General.

Royal Gazette, Fredericton, NB, 10 July 1861:

Provincial Appointments — William Brydone Jack D.C.L. to be President of the University of New Brunswick.

William Brydone Jack was the second President of the University of New Brunswick (1861-1885), having come to this university from Scotland in the autumn of 1840, and serving the college faithfully for forty-five years. In connection with the mathematical and physical studies, he installed the fine equatorial telescope, at the time the best in British North America. He was the initiator of surveying, which led to the department of engineering. Besides his administrative and scholastic ability, he was an admirable speaker. He was a strong and vigorous man, over six feet in height, and fond of open exercise, walking, gardening, curling and driving spirited horses. One of the early university maps indicates Jack’s Iris Field and Gardens.

He died in 1886, survived by his second wife, Caroline Disbrow, and their four children: William Disbrow, M.D., of Vancouver; Arthur of California; Mabel A., who married Louis B. Millidge of Saint John; and Robin E. Brydone, who was appointed Engineer of Public Works for Canada. Robin Jack lived in Vancouver and married a daughter of Frederick Fisher of Woodstock, New Brunswick.

Much credit is given to William Brydone Jack and his colleagues, Dr. Robb, who lies buried close by, and Marshall d’Avray, for the development of the University of New Brunswick. During their tenure, however, there was government criticism that college costs were out of proportion to the benefits received, that discipline was lax, and the curricula unrelated to local educational needs.

This brilliant man could have forsaken Fredericton and accepted any of the many invitations from leading world universities. He instead chose to remain in Fredericton. The last years of Jack’s life were plagued with ill health, but in the era of very small salaries and no pensions, he was forced to continue working. Eventually the university granted him a very small pension, the first of the University of New Brunswick to be so recognized. He did make one trip back to his beloved Scotland, in 1886, the year in which he died. He was elected President of the St. Andrews Society in 1832 and held that office until 1847.

Many children were baptised "Jack," in such high regard was William Brydone Jack held.

A plaque on the Old Arts Building, UNB, reads:

William Brydone Jack, 1819-1886. Born in Scotland and educated at St. Andrews, Jack came to Fredericton in 1840 as Professor of Maths, Natural Philosophy, and Astronomy at Kings College. In 1851 he built the first astronomical observatory in what is now Canada and equipped it with the best available instruments. In collaboration with Harvard University, he established the correct longitude of Fredericton and several other N.B. sites and corrected errors in the international boundary. President of the University, 1861-1865, he succeeded in establishing the young institution upon firm academic foundations. Jack put the university on a solid footing and it prospered and grew during his 24 years. But like Head, the preceding president, it was a matter of student discipline that eventually proved his undoing.

A St. Andrews Cross marks the grave of William Brydone Jack.

Three men named John Lothrop Marsh

Marsh

Lot #182. This double lot was purchased by John Lothrop Marsh III, Police Magistrate, in 1859. He and his wife, Hester, are buried here with his parents, John Lothrop Marsh, Jr. and Sophia Miriam Beckwith, and his sisters, Julia and Sophia. Also here are the two children of Sophia and her husband Laughlan McLean. The grandparents of the police magistrate, John Lothrop Marsh and his wife Sarah Estabrooks, are buried in this graveyard and may be buried in this lot.

John L. Marsh, born 12 July 1758, died 3 May 1859. His wife, Sarah Estabrooks, born 10 October 1764, died 2 January 1844 aged 80.

John Lothrop Marsh, born 12 July 1796, died 1853. His wife, Sophie Miriam Beckwith, born [?], died 1851.

John Lothrop Marsh, born 22 January 1830, died 1914. His wife, Hester Frink, born 1839, died 1917 aged 78.

Only the small stone to the two children marks the Marsh lot today:

In memory of John L. Marsh, d. Dec. 13, 1856, ae 11 months, 21 days. Sophia Marion Beckwith, d. May 25, 1862, ae 2 years and 4 months.

Johnnie and Minnie, children of Lauchlan and Sophia L. McLean.

There is another little hand /To Heaven’s sweet harp and strings given /Another gentle seraph’s voice /Another star in heaven.

The first John Lothrop Marsh here was a Loyalist, born in Fairfield, Connecticut, the son of Simeon Marsh and Eunice Lothrop. His sisters were Elizabeth, who married Lt. Leonard Reed in 1793, and Sarah, who married Valentine Harding in 1795. His brothers were Solomon and Ebenezer, who went to Upper Canada in 1782 to live, and the Reverend Thomas Marsh, a missionary to Tennessee.

John Lothrop Marsh, the Loyalist, came to New Brunswick in 1783. In 1790 he married, in Canning, Sarah, daughter of Elijah Estabrooks of Cornwallis, Nova Scotia. Their children were Thomas Lothrop (born 1791), Elizabeth (born 1793), Charles William (born 1794), John Lothrop (born 1796), Elijah (born 1799), and George (born 1802).

John Lothrop Marsh, the son, in 1824 married Sophia Miriam Beckwith, a daughter of Nehemiah Beckwith and Julie-Louise Le Brun de Duplessis. Sophia was a sister of the Honourable John A. Beckwith and of the author Julia Beckwith Hart who is buried elsewhere in this burial ground. She was living in Kingston with her widowed mother, who, upon the death of Nehemiah, had taken her family there, probably to join her widowed sister, Elizabeth, Madame Antoine Ferland.

New Brunswick Royal Gazette, 23 November 1824:

Married at Quebec, on Sunday the 10th ult. by the Rev. Doctor Mountain, Mr. John Lothrop Marsh, of Wakefield, N.B. to Miss Sophia Beckwith, of Kingston, Upper Canada.

The census for 1851 lists John L. Marsh, merchant, 50, living with his children: Amelia, 23; John L., 21; Sophia, 18; Julia, 16; Arthur, 13; and Sarah, 10. His wife’s residence at the time of the census is not known.

John Lothrop Marsh [III] was admitted to the Bar of New Brunswick in 1854 and was a partner of the firm Marsh and Beckwith. He married Hester C. Frink, eldest daughter of S.P. Frink, in 1859. He and his sister Julia were the executors of their father’s will in 1871.

Julia Louise Le Brun Marsh married Edward John Russell, artist and illustrator, who was employed before his marriage as a bookkeeper at the Beckwith & Marsh lumber mill. She died in 1880, survived by her husband, five sons, and a daughter.

Sophia Le Brun Marsh, the second sister of John Lothrop Marsh, married Lauchlan McLean, a merchant, the son of a Scottish settler at Grand Lake. A few years after their marriage, the couple moved to Saint John. Besides the two buried here, their children were Hugh Havelock (born 22 March 1854), Arthur B. (born 1857), Charles Herbert, and Maud. Their eldest son, Major General Hugh Havelock McLean, was Lieutenant Governor of New Brunswick 1928-1935.

Census, Fredericton, NB, 1871:

John L. MARSH, 42, b. NB, Lawyer, Wesleyan Methodist

Hester, 32, b. NB, Wesleyan Methodist

Hugh McLEAN, 17, b. NB, Student, Wesleyan Methodist

Eliza PETERS, 23, b. NB, Servant, Maid, African.

On 1 May 1871, an Act was passed "Relating to the Police Establishment in the City of Fredericton," regulating the office of the Police Magistrate. John Marsh was appointed to that position, to receive an annual salary not exceeding $400. He was empowered to appoint a police force, a staff of able men, not exceeding three. Included was a caution about the taverns of the town: a section of the Act stated that if a tavern keeper harboured or entertained any policeman on duty, he could be fined or have his license cancelled by the magistrate. Forty-two years later, on his 84th birthday, John Lothrop Marsh was still holding that office.

In 1871, John Marsh was appointed Lieutenant Colonel of the 71st York Battalion of Infantry, and was still in command in 1885. He lived at 690 George Street. He is described as very dapper, immaculately turned out. He always wore a frock coat to the Sunday services at the Cathedral. In 1881 census shows John Marsh, Police Magistrate, living with his wife, Hester, and two daughters: Florence L., 9, and Mary Sophie (born 1874), aged 6.

Royal Gazette, Fredericton, NB, 2 August 1882:

PROCLAMATION

Whereas some person or persons did on the night of the thirty-first of July last make a felonious assault with firearms upon John L. Marsh, Esquire, Police Magistrate, at his residence in Fredericton: I do therefore publish this Proclamation and do hereby offer a Reward of Two Hundred Dollars for such information as will secure the conviction of the person or persons guilty of said offence.

Given under my Hand and Seal at Fredericton, the second day of August, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighty-two, and in the forty-sixth year of Her Majesty’s Reign. — By Command of the Lieutenant Governor P.A. Landry

Francis Straton and family

Straton

The Straton family lot contained eight stones, a broken base, and a footstone. The eight stones have been replaced by a large new stone. A marker in the shape of a cross, inscribed “Minnie” and “Frank,” also stands in this lot.

In memory of Sarah Jane Straton, born 1817 died 1864, aged 47 years.

Royal Gazette, Fredericton, NB, 12 November 1842:

Married on Monday the 31st ultimo, in Christ Church, Fredericton, by the Venerable Archdeacon, Francis A.H. Straton, Barrister-at-Law, to Sarah Jane, eldest daughter of the late George P. Bliss.

Francis A.H. Straton was a grandson of Lieut. James Straton. He was appointed Clerk of the Executive Council on 30 May 1856 and remained in office until his death. He was also a senior partner, with J. Henry Phair, of the law firm of Straton and Phair. The Phair and Straton families were connected by marriage.

Francis Straton married Sarah Jane Bliss in 1842. They lived with her widowed mother and numerous family members in Brunswick Street for many years. He moved his family to another house, 736 Brunswick Street, a few months before Sarah’s death. There were ten children by this marriage.

In memory of “Minnie” who died at the age of nine years, and “Frank” who died aged two years. ‘Not dead but sleeping.’

According to the Cathedral records of 1860, “Minnie” was Mary Harriet Rebecca Straton. “IHS,” a stone in memory of Andrew William “Andy” Straton, was erected by his cousin and friend Bliss Carman. Andrew Straton died a young man. There is also a footstone inscribed “A.W.S.”

In memory of Barry Straton, died October 10, 1901, aged 47 years.

Barry Straton was a lawyer but did not practice. Not as well known as his cousins, Bliss Carman and Charles G.D. Roberts, he wrote poetry of exceptional merit. He lived all his life with his grandmama in the oldest and original part of the large house in Brunswick Street upon what was once the John Murray Bliss grant. He never spoke to his stepmother, Augusta, who lived in an addition to the home. He died in Maugerville. For over sixty years this house at 736 Brunswick Street was known as Straton Manor and remains so today.

Sacred to the memory of John M. Straton, first mate of the Barque GENII.

Morning Telegraph, Saint John, NB, 7 October 1869:

Perhaps one of the most appalling disasters which the storm of Monday night brought about is the loss of the new barque “Genii”, 500 ton Register at New River… She sailed in ballast from St. Andrews on Friday last and arrived at New River on Saturday morn. to load deals for Liverpool under charter of J.E. Knight, Esq., lessee of the mills of Messrs. Prescott & Lawrence at that place. There were some 60,000 feet of deals rafted and ready to be put on board on Monday. The raft being completed, it was placed under the lee of the breakwater which, it was thought, would offer it ample security from the effects of the coming storm. The pilot of the ship, Capt. James Clarke of St. Andrews, had been put ashore and it was intended that he should be taken on board ship again toward night. The Stevedores, George and Peter McVicker had come from Mascarene bringing their crew, six in number, with them, and thus all, except the Pilot were on board when night came on. The following are the names of the men who were lost: Charles Bayley of Westport, Brier Island, Capt.; John M. Straton of Fredericton, Mate…

The eldest son of Francis A.H. Straton, was a victim of the disastrous Saxby Gale that occurred in the 26th year of his age. Jack Straton perished on 4 October 1869 and his remains were returned to Fredericton. He was buried with “Masonic and military honours” from his father’s Brunswick Street home. Old schoolmates and friends erected a stone in token of their respect and esteem. A small base is all that remains, and a footstone inscribed “JMS.”

In memory of James Murray Straton.

James Murray Straton was gazetted Second Lieutenant, New Brunswick Artillery, 14 April 1863, according to the New Brunswick Journals militia list of 1867. He was buried from the Cathedral on 9 October 1869, at the age of 25.

In memory of Francis A.H. Straton, died June 16, 1900, aged 88 years and his second wife Augusta, died February 23, 1906, aged 76. Their daughter Mary Isabella Straton died Dec. 28, 1956 aged 86 years.

In July 1866, Francis A.H. Straton married, secondly, Augusta, daughter of Benjamin L. Peters. For his second marriage, F.A.H. Straton had a house built adjoining the family homestead. They had two children. Their son, Brooke, is buried at Rumford, Maine. Their daughter, Mary I. (“May”), was blind. She died at the home of Walter P. Fenety, where she had resided for more than fifty years, and is buried in the family plot.