John Elliot Woolford, artist and architect

Woolford

In memory of J. E. Woolford, Esq., late Barrack Master, Fredericton, died 12th Jan. 1866, aged 88 years.

In memory of Margaret, wife of J. E. Woolford, Esq.

Royal Gazette, Fredericton, NB, 6 February 1833:

Died on Wednesday morning last, the 30th ult., Mrs. Margaret Fullerton, wife of J. E. Woolford, Esquire, Barrack Master of this place, deeply and deservedly regretted.

John Elliot Woolford of the Barracks Department was appointed Assistant Barrack Master at Saint John in 1823. He bore the title until 1839 or 1840 when he was described in the New Brunswick Almanack as Deputy Barrack Master, and in 1842 as Barrack Master. He had charge of the army buildings in Fredericton.

J. E. Woolford was in charge of the building of Government House, and the very fine plans of the same are now in the Archives, Ottawa. The contract for building Government House was awarded to Jedediah Slason, and it was built in 1827.

New Brunswick Royal Gazette, 14 March 1826:

Contracts will be received by William F. Odell, Thomas Wetmore and Samuel D. Street… building a college… rough stone, hewn stone for the corners, boards, planks and scantling.

William F. Odell and the Reverend George Best advertised contracts in the New Brunswick Royal Gazette, April 1826, for a building for King’s College. The contract was awarded to James Taylor and also to Cross and Murray of Saint John. J.E. Woolford was the architect, and a model of the college building which he designed stood in his home.

Had there been a public library at that time, Mr. Woolford probably would have designed it, as the following notice suggests:

Royal Gazette, Fredericton, NB, 19 July 1839:

Fredericton Library — A General Meeting of the Proprietors is requested at the residence of Mr. Woolford on Friday afternoon next at 21st instance at 4 o’clock to decide upon the selection of a Library Room and such others matters as may be brought before the meeting. By order of the President. R. Gowan, Secretary.

J.E. Woolford resided in Regent Street opposite the Park Barracks until 1841.

Royal Gazette, Fredericton, NB, 10 July 1839:

Notice "The Subscriber" respectfully intimates to his friends and the Public that he has taken that commodious and pleasantly situated House in Regent Street owned by Captain James Segee next door to J. E. Woolford, Esq. and nearly opposite to Mr. Donald McLeod where he intends keeping a Genteel Boarding House for the reception of permanent and Transient Boarders. Good staffing is required. Joseph Estabrooks.

Royal Gazette, Fredericton, NB, 1 November 1841:

Welner-Baile Tailoring Shop in the House lately occupied by Barrack Master Woolford, Regent Street.

He was one of the artists who exhibited at the Grand Exhibition in Saint John in August 1842, and was President of the Floral and Horticultural Society of New Brunswick in 1843. He retired in 1859 from the Barracks Department, but remained in Fredericton until his death.

The Head Quarters, Fredericton, NB, 17 January 1866:

John E. WOOLFORD, Esq., late Barrack Master in this garrison was a native of England, born in London; served under Duke of York in Holland, afterwards under Sir Ralph ABERCROMBIE in Egypt where he was present at all the principal engagements. It was there that his merit as a sketcher of landscapes attracted the attention of Lord Dalhousie, under whose patronage he settled in Scotland on his return as an artist. On Lord DALHOUSIE’s appointment to the Government of Nova Scotia, he accompanied him to that country. In 1821 when his Lordship made a tour through Upper and Lower to Lake Superior, he attended him as an artist, and took views of all the principal residences on their route. In 1823 on a change being made in the Barrack Dept., he received his late appointment to this garrison and held it until 1858. It was the plans of Mr. WOOLFORD that both the College and Government House were built. He was married to a lady of the ERSKINE family, related to Lord BUCHAN and the late Lady DOUGLAS wife of Sir Howard DOUGLAS.

Ann, wife of James Taylor

Taylor

In memory of Ann, wife of James Taylor of this city who died 2nd Jan. 1863 aged 67 years. Native of Carlisle, England.

Footstone: “A.T.”

Two bases of stones are found in the lot next to the Adams lot. Part of one stone lies flat next to its base and carries the above inscription. This tombstone has been repaired, and if there had been more to the inscription, it is obliterated by cement.

In 1861, James Taylor had at least three acres under cultivation: hay, oats, and potatoes. His farm was near the Carleton Farm of the Odells.

Descendants of the Honourable and Reverend Jonathan Odell

Odell

Sacred to the memory of Elizabeth Ludlow, wife of George M. Odell, M.D., of Fredericton who died April 19, 1861 in the 35th year of her age. "Them that sleep in Jesus will God bring with him."

George Mountain Odell, M.D., died at Newport, Rhode Island, April 21, 1892 in the 75th year of his age. "I believe in the life everlasting."

Charles Odell, C.E., May 27, 1898. Sadie Odell, Dec. 3, 1910. Erected in loving memory of our dear father and mother.

These three tombstones are surrounded by a stone fence.

G.M. Odell at present at Newport State of Rhode Island claims a lot in the burying lot 18 x 24, situate in the north corner enclosed by a wooden fence set on stones. Purchased from Robert Wood about 1861.

The Honourable and Reverend Jonathan Odell came to New Brunswick in 1783 with the New England Loyalists. A clergyman of the Church of England, he was for many years the government Secretary of the Province. His only son, Hon. William Franklin Odell (1774-1844), also a Loyalist, had four sons: William Hunter, George Mountain, James, and Charles. The house in which they were born and brought up had been built by their grandfather, Rev. Jonathan Odell. Their father, William F. Odell, later built "Rookwood", and the original family home ultimately became a residence for the youngest son, Charles.

George Mountain Odell lived for some time in St. Mary’s on the Caleb Fowler farm, which his father subsequently bequeathed to him in 1844. In 1846 he bought a town house in Brunswick Street from Horatio Nelson Drake and married not long after.

Royal Gazette, Fredericton, NB, 3 November 1847:

Married on Tuesday, the 26th ult. at St. Paul’s Church, Halifax, by the Rev. Dr. Twining, Chaplain of the Garrison, George Mountain Odell M.D., son of the late Hon. W.F. Odell of Fredericton, N.B., to Elizabeth Ludlow, daughter of D.L. Robinson, an uncle of Deputy Commissary General Robinson.

Dr. G.M. Odell married, secondly, Susan Philipse, daughter of Morris Robinson. She was a cousin of the Honourable F.P. Robinson. In 1865, Mrs. George Lee bequeathed to Susan P. Odell, her niece, wife of Dr. George M. Odell, £100, “also her work table and sofa table,” and a portrait of her father Morris Robinson. There is no inscription here in memory of Dr. Odell’s second wife.

New Brunswick Reporter, Fredericton, NB, 27 April 1892:

Intelligence of the death of Dr. Geo. M. Odell at Newport, R.I. last week was heard with sorrow by many of the old families in Fredericton whose physician and friend the deceased had been. Dr. Odell was for many years a leading physician here. His remains were brought to this city Monday and interred in the family enclosure in the old cemetery. The chief mourners were Capt. Odell, nephew of the deceased; Delancy Robinson, F.A.H. Straton and Geo. C. Hunt. Closely following these were all of the city physicians. The pall bearers were Sir John Allen, Judge Fraser, Lt. Col. Maunsell, Andrew Inches, E.H. Wilmot and J. Henry Phair. Capt. Odell was at the bedside for a couple of days before he died and accompanied the remains to the city. Rev. G.G. Roberts performed the last rites at the grave.

Charles Odell, born 16 August 1826, was twice married, first to Maynard Eliza Grange (born 1835) by whom he had two children, Florence Mary and George Grange. In 1867, Charles married, secondly, Sarah, daughter of John D. Kinnear, Judge of Probate for Cumberland County, Nova Scotia. They had five children. His eldest son, George Grange Odell, often visited his father from South America where he worked as an engineer. It is remembered that one of his parrots hid in the Cathedral and disrupted a Sunday service.

Their house, occupied for a hundred years or more by the Odell family, is now the Deanery. It is shown in the first town plat, the plan of which was made by Lieut. Dugald Campbell. Above each of the two upper rooms was a loft or sleeping quarter, entirely separate. The large iron rings bolted into the woodwork were probably placed there to chain deserters during one of the early periods of the movement of troops through Fredericton. Until 1844, this house with gardens, yards, stables, outhouses, together with land in rear, extended to Charlotte Street.

The family of Matthew Brannan

Brannan / Brannen

God is love. Sacred to the memory of James W. Brannan, died May 27, 1863 aged 44 years, His wife Hannah M. died Aug. 27, 1863 aged 39 years. Also their son Frederick died Jan. 14, 1865, aged 8 years.

The unmarked graves of Matthew Brannan and his wife and daughter are known to be in this lot. Matthew Brannan died 13 July 1855, aged 78. His wife, Rebecca Weade, died 8 February 1861, aged 84. Rebecca Sophia, daughter of Matthew and Rebecca Brannan, died 20 September 1860, aged 46. Their funerals are recorded at the Cathedral.

This large lot, enclosed by an iron rail, contains today but one tombstone. James Byron Weade Brannan was a son of Matthew Brannan and a grandson of the Loyalist Charles Brannen who came to New Brunswick as a private in the 2nd DeLancey’s commanded by Lieut. Col. Richard Hewlitt.

Matthew Brannan, born in 1777, came with his father as a Loyalist. They lived for a time up the Nashwaak, where he met the family of Philip Weade and married his daughter Rebecca. She was the granddaughter of John Carnes, a Fredericton merchant situated on the corner of Queen and Regent Streets. Matthew Brannan bought the house of the deceased John Carnes in 1802 and sold it in 1808. His daughter, Catherine Phoebe, married Benjamin Woolhaupter when she was a young girl, not sixteen years old. In 1797 Matthew opened a school in Fredericton which had 30 white students and eleven black students.

Matthew Brannan entered the office of the Provincial Secretary and was the right-hand man for Hon. William Franklin Odell. He served in that office for many years and was held in high regard by everyone.

Journals of the House of Assembly, New Brunswick, 1833:

To Matthew Brannen of the Secretary’s office the sum of 150 pounds as a mark of approbation of his attentive and courteous demeanor in the said office.

He received a like grant for many years and had long and faithful service.