Martha Braine, wife of Alexander McKilligan

McKilligan

Only the stone base for a once large tombstone remains today to mark the graves of the family of Alexander McKilligan of Fredericton. An inscription included in the graveyard notes of Dr. Hannay, which were given to Lillian Brown Maxwell, read:

Sacred to the memory of Martha wife of Alexander McKilligan, who died April 29th 1866 aged 68 years. A native of Forres, Scotland.

Martha’s age at the time of her death is uncertain. The Fredericton census 1851 gives Alexander McKilligan, aged 32; Martha, wife, 40, and Margaret, mother, 60. The census of 1861 lists Alexander McKilligan, 40, baker; Martha, wife, 40; Margaret Ritchie, niece, 19; and Margaret McKilligan, mother, 77. It is likely that both wife and mother lie buried here, and conceivably Alexander McKilligan himself.

Royal Gazette, Fredericton, NB, 29 April 1842:

Alexander McKilligan — NEW BAKERY Charlotte Street – Adjoining the residence of A.W. McBeath, Esq.

Royal Gazette, Fredericton, NB, 22 May 1844:

Married at Government House, on the 18th instant, by the Rev. John M. Brooke of St. Paul’s Church, Mr. Alexander McKilligan, to Miss Martha Braine, both of Fredericton.

New Brunswick Directory for 1865-66:

McKilligan, Alexander, City Marshall, Charlotte St. near Sunbury

The Fredericton Evening Capital, Fredericton, NB, 29 May 1886:

Alexander McKILLIGAN was laid to rest in the Old Burying Ground, Fredericton on Thursday. He came to Fredericton 47 years ago from Miramichi to which place he had emigrated from the north of Scotland several years previously. Engaging here in the baking business with Mr. CLARK, whose bake house and shop were in Waterloo Row, he soon branchedout for himself. About that time he married the housekeeper of Lady COLEBROOK wife of Lt. GOV. COLEBROOK. She died long ago and he was buried in the same grave that held his first love. Subsequently he became City Marshall. Marrying a second time, he left the city about twenty years ago, taking up residence on his farm near the junction of the Tay and Nashwaak. There he lived till Tuesday last, periodically coming to town. He was a member of the old St. Andrews Society. He was one of the fathers of curling in N.B. In 1854, John NEILL founded the Fredericton Curling Club and of the eight original members, he alone is left. The others, who have preceded Alex. McKilligan to the grave, were Robert FULTON, Robert THORBURN, John F. TAYLOR, Harry PHAIR, Wm A. McLEAN and James MOORE. McKilligan’s funeral was conducted by Jackson Adams, Undertaker. Rev. A.J. Mowatt performed the ceremonies. McKilligan was 68 years old and leaves a widow and one son.

John Neill, founder of Fredericton Curling Club

Neill

John Neill died Feb. 19, 1893, in the 73rd year of his age. His wife Jane died May 3rd 1912, in the 83rd year of her age.

John E. died May 29th, 1873, ae 21 years. Charlie W. died July 16th, 1870 ae 8 years. Sons of John and Jane Neill.

Thomas A., born July 1859, ae 3 months.

Robert Neill died June 19, 1892, ae 32 years.

Lot #120 was once enclosed with strong posts, rod and chains. The stone is engraved on four sides, with John Neill’s inscription facing west.

John Neill came from Scotland and began a hardware business, Fredericton’s Big Hardware Store, that continued for many years into the third generation. He was the secretary of the Fredericton Society of St. Andrews from 1847 to 1852, and it was he who introduced curling into Fredericton. He founded the Fredericton Curling Club in 1854, and the curling stones were bought at his store. The club originally consisted of eight members: John Neill, Alexander McKilligan, Robert Fulton, Robert Thorburn, John F. Taylor, Barry Phair, William A. McLean, and Thomas Moore. John Neill was the last survivor.

His wife, Jane, was a daughter of Samuel D. MacPherson. The Neills had a large family, which in 1871 consisted of James S., 21; Annie, 19; Frances, 17; Mary, 15; John, 14; Robert, 10; Alice, 5; and Albert and Albertina, twins, 3 years old. James and Albert continued to operate the family business after the death of their father.

John Neill claims a lot in the New Part of the Burial Ground, size about 12 x 16 feet. Bounded south by the late Archdeacon Coster’s lot and on the North by the late James Agnew’s lot. Enclosed by stone posts and chains and is marked by a monument to the claimer’s son John E. Neill. Claimer purchased this lot from Geo Botsford in 1859.

Thomas Sampson, Charles Sampson, and Turner’s Express

Sampson

Thomas Sampson 1807-1854

Jane Sampson 1819-1900

James Henry 1843-1846

Jane 1841-1915

Children of Thomas and Jane Sampson

Thomas Sampson came from England in 1830 with his wife and a baby. His wife died upon arrival, and he was remarried to Jane Johnson, who was Irish. He was a tinsmith and a printer.

Saint John, NB, 23 January 1854:

Deaths at Fredericton on the 17th inst. Mr. Thomas Sampson, aged 49 years, formerly of Devonshire, England.

The census for 1861 shows the widow Jane Sampson, 43, living with her children Thomas, 22, printer; Charles, 21; Jane, 19; John, 15; and William, 13. Hutchinson’s New Brunswick Directory for 1865-1866 lists Jane Sampson, widow of Thomas, and her two eldest sons located at Carleton near King Street. Thomas was a printer and Charles A. was an agent for Turner’s Express. Mary, Thomas Sampson’s daughter by his first wife, married John Harrison in 1859 at Portland, Maine.

New Brunswick Directory for 1865-66:

Turner’s American Express, Charles A. Sampson, Agent, Queen Street forwards packages and parcels of goods and money, goods purchased, notes, drafts and bills collected, Fredericton, St. John, Halifax, Boston, New York.

Turner’s Express was an active company, with agents in towns throughout the province. The elder Sampson may also have been connected with the business. In 1833 the schedule was Fredericton to Saint John, stopping overnight en route, proceeding the next day to Eastport, this part of the journey by stage. The following day at noon a sailing ship left Eastport for Boston, a trip that usually took two and a half days. This was speedier and more pleasant than going all the way by stage, which took eleven days.

The Gleaner, Fredericton, NB, 25 October, 1895:

Thomas Sampson, formerly of this city, but for some time back employed on the staff of a daily newspaper in Norwich, Conn., is in Fredericton on a visit. This is his first visit during 27 years. Mr. Sampson served his apprenticeship to the Art Preservative with the late John Simpson, Queen’s Printer in the Royal Gazette office. He is a brother of C.A. Sampson, Secretary of the Board of School Trustees. In his first stroll down Queen Street in 27 years, accompanied by his sister, he received quite an ovation from numerous old friends. About 1866 Mr. Sampson was an active member of the old Victoria Rifles (Capt. Simonds) of this city, as well as the old No. 1 engine company (Capt. John Moore) at present our esteemed city treasurer.

Jane, the widow of Thomas Sampson, is remembered as residing in Carleton Street with her unmarried daughter, “Jenny.” The family was prominent in the work of the Wilmot Church, and Charles Sampson was for many years Secretary of the Fredericton School Board.

Private James “Jimmy” Parsons

Parsons

In Memory of Private J. Parsons, died May 23rd, 1885, aged 20 years. This tablet was erected by his comrades of "A" Company, Royal School of Infantry

The Parsons lot is between the Colter and Anderson lots.  A handsome marble tablet marks the grave of "Jimmy" Parsons, son of Andrew Howard Parsons of Fredericton, who died of black diphtheria.

Daily Sun, Saint John, NB, 26 May 1885:

Private Parsons, Infantry School Corps, who was sent home from Sussex, with an attack of diphtheria, died in the hospital at Fredericton Saturday afternoon and the remains were interred the same eve. with military honors, a firing party in charge of Sgt. WILSON turning out from I.S.C. and 71st batt. The Fredericton brass headed the cortege and services at the grave were said by Rev. F. Alexander. Parsons belonged to Oromocto (Sunbury Co.) and removed with his family to Fredericton last spring. He was unmarried.

Fredericton Evening Capital, Fredericton, NB, 3 December 1887:

The memorial tablet in memory of the late Private J. parsons is now completed and ready for setting up in the Rural Cemetery, Fredericton. It reflects the greatest credit of John Moore from whose work it was sculptured.

There are also four small tombstones belonging to the Parsons family erected by B.L. Parsons, sister of Private J. Parsons: "My brothers Jimmy and Andrew," "Jane, our pet sister," and "Mother." Miss Parsons’ brother Andrew, considered the best painter in his day, was born in 1871 and died three months short of 100 years of age.