Martha Braine, wife of Alexander McKilligan

McKilligan

Only the stone base for a once large tombstone remains today to mark the graves of the family of Alexander McKilligan of Fredericton. An inscription included in the graveyard notes of Dr. Hannay, which were given to Lillian Brown Maxwell, read:

Sacred to the memory of Martha wife of Alexander McKilligan, who died April 29th 1866 aged 68 years. A native of Forres, Scotland.

Martha’s age at the time of her death is uncertain. The Fredericton census 1851 gives Alexander McKilligan, aged 32; Martha, wife, 40, and Margaret, mother, 60. The census of 1861 lists Alexander McKilligan, 40, baker; Martha, wife, 40; Margaret Ritchie, niece, 19; and Margaret McKilligan, mother, 77. It is likely that both wife and mother lie buried here, and conceivably Alexander McKilligan himself.

Royal Gazette, Fredericton, NB, 29 April 1842:

Alexander McKilligan — NEW BAKERY Charlotte Street – Adjoining the residence of A.W. McBeath, Esq.

Royal Gazette, Fredericton, NB, 22 May 1844:

Married at Government House, on the 18th instant, by the Rev. John M. Brooke of St. Paul’s Church, Mr. Alexander McKilligan, to Miss Martha Braine, both of Fredericton.

New Brunswick Directory for 1865-66:

McKilligan, Alexander, City Marshall, Charlotte St. near Sunbury

The Fredericton Evening Capital, Fredericton, NB, 29 May 1886:

Alexander McKILLIGAN was laid to rest in the Old Burying Ground, Fredericton on Thursday. He came to Fredericton 47 years ago from Miramichi to which place he had emigrated from the north of Scotland several years previously. Engaging here in the baking business with Mr. CLARK, whose bake house and shop were in Waterloo Row, he soon branchedout for himself. About that time he married the housekeeper of Lady COLEBROOK wife of Lt. GOV. COLEBROOK. She died long ago and he was buried in the same grave that held his first love. Subsequently he became City Marshall. Marrying a second time, he left the city about twenty years ago, taking up residence on his farm near the junction of the Tay and Nashwaak. There he lived till Tuesday last, periodically coming to town. He was a member of the old St. Andrews Society. He was one of the fathers of curling in N.B. In 1854, John NEILL founded the Fredericton Curling Club and of the eight original members, he alone is left. The others, who have preceded Alex. McKilligan to the grave, were Robert FULTON, Robert THORBURN, John F. TAYLOR, Harry PHAIR, Wm A. McLEAN and James MOORE. McKilligan’s funeral was conducted by Jackson Adams, Undertaker. Rev. A.J. Mowatt performed the ceremonies. McKilligan was 68 years old and leaves a widow and one son.

John Neill, founder of Fredericton Curling Club

Neill

John Neill died Feb. 19, 1893, in the 73rd year of his age. His wife Jane died May 3rd 1912, in the 83rd year of her age.

John E. died May 29th, 1873, ae 21 years. Charlie W. died July 16th, 1870 ae 8 years. Sons of John and Jane Neill.

Thomas A., born July 1859, ae 3 months.

Robert Neill died June 19, 1892, ae 32 years.

Lot #120 was once enclosed with strong posts, rod and chains. The stone is engraved on four sides, with John Neill’s inscription facing west.

John Neill came from Scotland and began a hardware business, Fredericton’s Big Hardware Store, that continued for many years into the third generation. He was the secretary of the Fredericton Society of St. Andrews from 1847 to 1852, and it was he who introduced curling into Fredericton. He founded the Fredericton Curling Club in 1854, and the curling stones were bought at his store. The club originally consisted of eight members: John Neill, Alexander McKilligan, Robert Fulton, Robert Thorburn, John F. Taylor, Barry Phair, William A. McLean, and Thomas Moore. John Neill was the last survivor.

His wife, Jane, was a daughter of Samuel D. MacPherson. The Neills had a large family, which in 1871 consisted of James S., 21; Annie, 19; Frances, 17; Mary, 15; John, 14; Robert, 10; Alice, 5; and Albert and Albertina, twins, 3 years old. James and Albert continued to operate the family business after the death of their father.

John Neill claims a lot in the New Part of the Burial Ground, size about 12 x 16 feet. Bounded south by the late Archdeacon Coster’s lot and on the North by the late James Agnew’s lot. Enclosed by stone posts and chains and is marked by a monument to the claimer’s son John E. Neill. Claimer purchased this lot from Geo Botsford in 1859.

Three men named John Lothrop Marsh

Marsh

Lot #182. This double lot was purchased by John Lothrop Marsh III, Police Magistrate, in 1859. He and his wife, Hester, are buried here with his parents, John Lothrop Marsh, Jr. and Sophia Miriam Beckwith, and his sisters, Julia and Sophia. Also here are the two children of Sophia and her husband Laughlan McLean. The grandparents of the police magistrate, John Lothrop Marsh and his wife Sarah Estabrooks, are buried in this graveyard and may be buried in this lot.

John L. Marsh, born 12 July 1758, died 3 May 1859. His wife, Sarah Estabrooks, born 10 October 1764, died 2 January 1844 aged 80.

John Lothrop Marsh, born 12 July 1796, died 1853. His wife, Sophie Miriam Beckwith, born [?], died 1851.

John Lothrop Marsh, born 22 January 1830, died 1914. His wife, Hester Frink, born 1839, died 1917 aged 78.

Only the small stone to the two children marks the Marsh lot today:

In memory of John L. Marsh, d. Dec. 13, 1856, ae 11 months, 21 days. Sophia Marion Beckwith, d. May 25, 1862, ae 2 years and 4 months.

Johnnie and Minnie, children of Lauchlan and Sophia L. McLean.

There is another little hand /To Heaven’s sweet harp and strings given /Another gentle seraph’s voice /Another star in heaven.

The first John Lothrop Marsh here was a Loyalist, born in Fairfield, Connecticut, the son of Simeon Marsh and Eunice Lothrop. His sisters were Elizabeth, who married Lt. Leonard Reed in 1793, and Sarah, who married Valentine Harding in 1795. His brothers were Solomon and Ebenezer, who went to Upper Canada in 1782 to live, and the Reverend Thomas Marsh, a missionary to Tennessee.

John Lothrop Marsh, the Loyalist, came to New Brunswick in 1783. In 1790 he married, in Canning, Sarah, daughter of Elijah Estabrooks of Cornwallis, Nova Scotia. Their children were Thomas Lothrop (born 1791), Elizabeth (born 1793), Charles William (born 1794), John Lothrop (born 1796), Elijah (born 1799), and George (born 1802).

John Lothrop Marsh, the son, in 1824 married Sophia Miriam Beckwith, a daughter of Nehemiah Beckwith and Julie-Louise Le Brun de Duplessis. Sophia was a sister of the Honourable John A. Beckwith and of the author Julia Beckwith Hart who is buried elsewhere in this burial ground. She was living in Kingston with her widowed mother, who, upon the death of Nehemiah, had taken her family there, probably to join her widowed sister, Elizabeth, Madame Antoine Ferland.

New Brunswick Royal Gazette, 23 November 1824:

Married at Quebec, on Sunday the 10th ult. by the Rev. Doctor Mountain, Mr. John Lothrop Marsh, of Wakefield, N.B. to Miss Sophia Beckwith, of Kingston, Upper Canada.

The census for 1851 lists John L. Marsh, merchant, 50, living with his children: Amelia, 23; John L., 21; Sophia, 18; Julia, 16; Arthur, 13; and Sarah, 10. His wife’s residence at the time of the census is not known.

John Lothrop Marsh [III] was admitted to the Bar of New Brunswick in 1854 and was a partner of the firm Marsh and Beckwith. He married Hester C. Frink, eldest daughter of S.P. Frink, in 1859. He and his sister Julia were the executors of their father’s will in 1871.

Julia Louise Le Brun Marsh married Edward John Russell, artist and illustrator, who was employed before his marriage as a bookkeeper at the Beckwith & Marsh lumber mill. She died in 1880, survived by her husband, five sons, and a daughter.

Sophia Le Brun Marsh, the second sister of John Lothrop Marsh, married Lauchlan McLean, a merchant, the son of a Scottish settler at Grand Lake. A few years after their marriage, the couple moved to Saint John. Besides the two buried here, their children were Hugh Havelock (born 22 March 1854), Arthur B. (born 1857), Charles Herbert, and Maud. Their eldest son, Major General Hugh Havelock McLean, was Lieutenant Governor of New Brunswick 1928-1935.

Census, Fredericton, NB, 1871:

John L. MARSH, 42, b. NB, Lawyer, Wesleyan Methodist

Hester, 32, b. NB, Wesleyan Methodist

Hugh McLEAN, 17, b. NB, Student, Wesleyan Methodist

Eliza PETERS, 23, b. NB, Servant, Maid, African.

On 1 May 1871, an Act was passed "Relating to the Police Establishment in the City of Fredericton," regulating the office of the Police Magistrate. John Marsh was appointed to that position, to receive an annual salary not exceeding $400. He was empowered to appoint a police force, a staff of able men, not exceeding three. Included was a caution about the taverns of the town: a section of the Act stated that if a tavern keeper harboured or entertained any policeman on duty, he could be fined or have his license cancelled by the magistrate. Forty-two years later, on his 84th birthday, John Lothrop Marsh was still holding that office.

In 1871, John Marsh was appointed Lieutenant Colonel of the 71st York Battalion of Infantry, and was still in command in 1885. He lived at 690 George Street. He is described as very dapper, immaculately turned out. He always wore a frock coat to the Sunday services at the Cathedral. In 1881 census shows John Marsh, Police Magistrate, living with his wife, Hester, and two daughters: Florence L., 9, and Mary Sophie (born 1874), aged 6.

Royal Gazette, Fredericton, NB, 2 August 1882:

PROCLAMATION

Whereas some person or persons did on the night of the thirty-first of July last make a felonious assault with firearms upon John L. Marsh, Esquire, Police Magistrate, at his residence in Fredericton: I do therefore publish this Proclamation and do hereby offer a Reward of Two Hundred Dollars for such information as will secure the conviction of the person or persons guilty of said offence.

Given under my Hand and Seal at Fredericton, the second day of August, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighty-two, and in the forty-sixth year of Her Majesty’s Reign. — By Command of the Lieutenant Governor P.A. Landry

Stirling and Sterling

Sterling/Stirling

Sabine’s Loyalists of the American Revolution, Vol. II:

Jonathan Stirling died at St. Mary’s, York County, New Brunswick in 1826, aged seventy-six. Ann, his widow, died at the same place in 1845, at the age of eighty-two.

Jonathan Stirling, of Maryland, was a captain in the Maryland Loyalists. In 1783 he was one of the survivors of the transport ship Martha, wrecked on the passage to Nova Scotia. He settled at Saint John, New Brunswick, and was one of the grantees of that city. He received half-pay.

New Brunswick Royal Gazette, 11 November 1826:

All persons… estate of John Stirling, late of the Parish of St. Mary’s… immediate payment to… Geo. H. Sterling, Thos. Gill, Executors.

The Sterling property had a frontage of over six hundred feet, and is referred to locally as the “Archie Sterling property.” His house was splendidly located on the river bank. That large house was destroyed by fire.

Three McLean sisters married three brothers Sterling.

A. Addison Sterling was born and brought up on this property, and was a merchant in Fredericton for some years before his appointment as sheriff of York County, in 1883. He held that position for twenty-five years.

The Sterling property extended as far as the old school, which stood partly on Sterling property for one hundred years. The education of A. Addison Sterling was continued in Fredericton, and he walked across the river ice in winter, in the cold grey early morning and equally cold twilight. A new school stands on the site of the old schoolhouse and marks the upper line of the Harding property.

It is thought that the Sterlings are buried in the Old Burial Ground.

See also The Old Burying Ground, Vol. III, p. 208.