Robert Baxter and family

Baxter

Lot #75. There are eight graves in this lot, 6 x 8 feet, situated between that of Robert Weeks and the monument in memory of the Reverend John Brownell. The lot was purchased in 1808 from Henry Chestnut. There is one fairly new stone, complete with engravings.

Robert Baxter.

Louisa D. Baxter,

Nancy Baxter,

Harriet L. Baxter,

Hedley V. Baxter.

Robert Baxter kept a candy store. Harriet Louisa, daughter of Robert Baxter, was born 20 January 1867[?] and baptised in the Methodist Church in Fredericton on 1 February 1873. Louisa D. Hovey, Mrs. Baxter, died 15 December 1919 at Nashua, New Hampshire. Her last surviving daughter, Laura, died 18 May 1937 and is buried there.

Lovell’s Directory 1871:

Baxter, Mrs. Louise, Queen, Fredericton, widow of Robert/Storekeeper

The 1881 census for Fredericton lists Louisa Baxter, Methodist, English, dress maker, aged 40 years, widow. In her household were John Baxter, 20, tanner; Robert, 19, store clerk; Hedley, 17; Laura, 15; Charles, 13; and Hattie, 11.

Gleaner, Fredericton, NB, 4 July 1890:

News was received in the city last night of the death of Hedley Baxter at Haverhill, Mass. to which place he moved from here some 4 or 5 years ago. Deceased was employed for a number of years at Neill’s hardware store. The remains will be brought here for interment.

Gleaner, Fredericton, NB, 7 July 1890:

The funeral of Hedley BAXTER, the particulars of whose sad death at Haverhill, Mass., were given in Saturday’s ‘Gleaner’, took place from N.B.R. station upon the arrival of the train Saturday afternoon. The remains were accompanied by the deceased’s two brothers, Charles Baxter and Robert Baxter and Mr. Blake, a companion of Hedley’s, who walked together behind the hearse. The interment took place in the old burial ground, Rev. Payson conducting an impressive service.

Charles Long of Long’s Hotel, Fredericton

Long

Lot #34. This apparently vacant lot, 9 x 18 feet, situated between that of Richard Estey and John Gregory, is in the name of W.W. Long and was claimed by him in 1866. It is thought that Charles Long is buried here, possibly with his wife Catherine.

The Longs, like the Hovey family, came from Ludlow. Charles Long was the owner of Long’s Hotel, which was the large brick building on the corner of King and York Streets. He built a home at 369 George Street for himself and his family, which included Alfred E., a school teacher; George, a clerk; Isaac, a harness maker; and John, an ostler. William W. Long, who claimed this lot, was also a son of Charles.

The Old Kirk Baptismal Records list, 16 November 1854, a son, Andrew, born to William Long and his wife Jane Kelly.

In the Fredericton census of 1871, Charles Long, aged 64, and his wife Catherine, 63, are listed as living up the Nashwaak with their sons Isaac, 29, and Alfred, 20. In the same year William Long, 35, with his second wife, Louisa, 29, and a 1-year-old son, Harrison, were living in the home of Susanna Pickard, aged 76.

William W. Long was a charter member of the Fredericton Orange Lodge which was formed in 1844. He was described in the Fredericton Directory, 1865-66, as a farmer living at the corner of King and York Streets, and in the 1877 Directory as deputy sheriff and gaoler, living on Brunswick Street in the gaol.

The Hovey and Hooper families

Hovey

“Hovey” – there is nothing else inscribed on this handsome stone. The lot is #116 and is in the name of Stephen Hovey.

Sept. 27th [1866] Elizabeth Hovey claims on behalf of her father and his family a lot in the B. Ground, formally known as the "Hooper lot." Size about 18 feet square, and adjoining the Robb lot. Enclosed by a wooden railing. This lot was first purchased by Mrs. Hooper from Henry Chestnut.

Stephen Hovey, born 1812, a son of Stephen and Harriet Sayre Hovey, is most likely buried here, as well as his wife, Eliza Jane Agnew, born 1816. They lived in Fredericton from 1830 to 1900. Stephen Hovey was a filer on Charlotte Street. According to the census, 1861, their children were James, aged 22; Jane, 19; Rebecca and Harriet, twins, 17; Mary Alice, 14; Stephen E., 12; Allan, 10; Robert, 8; Isabell, 6; Charles, 4; and Elizabeth, 2. In the 1871 census the children of the household were Isabell, 15; Charles, 13; Elizabeth, 11; and Clara, 9. In the 1881 census, Stephen J. Hovey, 63, carpenter, and his wife Jane, 59, are listed with three of their daughters: Isabell, 24, a dressmaker; Lizzie, 20; and Clara, 18.

The first of the name, Aaron Hovey, came to the lower St. John River in 1769. In 1770 he claimed a 200-acre lot in consequence of a lease to Edmund Price, the father of his wife Dorothy. In 1783, according to the Studholm Report, he was living in Gagetown in a log house, with about 10 acres cleared. He eventually settled in the Miramichi. The children of Aaron Hovey and Dorothy Price were Janet, Abigail, Dorothy, Stephen (born 1783), Mary, Aaron (born 1788), Susanna (born 1793), Edmund (born 1795), James, Moses, Jacob Barker (born 1801), Allen, Jane (born 1797), and Asenath Ann (born 1808). Four daughters of Aaron Hovey married into Price families.

Aaron Hovey died 1839 in Ludlow, New Brunswick.

Royal Gazette, Fredericton, NB, 25 December 1839:

Died at Ludlow [Southwest Miramichi], after a short illness, This truly pious and exemplary Christian was born in Massachusetts, then a British colony, in 1761. He had been a resident of the parish of Ludlow for 28 years, during the whole of which period it had been his constant practice to assemble his neighbours upon the Sabbath day for the public worship of God. Upon these occasions he confined himself to reading the scriptures, prayer and exhortations to the holiness of life. His aim was to glorify his Creator and to benefit his destitute fellow men, not to exalt himself, hence his public devotions were marked by great simplicity and primitive brevity, and his private walk and conversation by manners plain and unassuming. To a neighbourhood devoid of regular religious instruction, as in the case with the community in which he lived, such a loss cannot easily be repaired. He closed his useful and blameless life on the 30th day of November, aged 78 years. He has left 126 descendants.

The Hoveys and Hoopers were related through marriage, and many unmarked graves of the Hooper family lie here.

In 1843, N.D. Hooper was a prominent member of the Kirk when the Reverend John M. Brooke arrived. In the 1860s, Nehemiah S. Hooper had a large business of groceries, liquors, and provisions, under the County Court House.

Isabel Agnew Hovey (born 1860) married, in 1880, W. Storey Hooper whose mother had been a Hovey. They lived at 114 George Street, which house had been owned and occupied for generations by the Hooper family. Storey Hooper, insurance agent, was manager of the Fredericton Exhibition Association and in 1912 was Mayor of Fredericton. He died in 1929, and his wife in 1940.

The James Agnew family

Agnew

James Agnew, Sarah Agnew. Our children

One small tombstone, topped with what appears to be a sleeping lamb, stands in this spacious lot.

Lot #82. Mrs. Agnew claims a lot in the B. Ground, situate in the upper of westerly part, Claimer presumes the lot extends between two paths and room for two graves in width. Bounded on the near side by John Mills’ lot. Not enclosed, has one stone to Agnew children. Claimer’s husband purchased the above lot from Mr. Chestnut some 20 years ago [c.1866].

James Agnew, born 1811, Irish, was a carpenter with several employees. In the 1870s he was one of the assessors in Fredericton. He lived in Charlotte Street, near Sunbury. Other family members were his wife Sarah (born 1824), daughters Ellen (born 1844), Clara (born 1862), and Elizabeth (born 1846), and his mother-in-law, Ellen Rutter (born 1801). Mrs. Stephen Hovey, Jane, was his sister. Another sister, Martha, married N. Cameron.