Descendants of the Honourable and Reverend Jonathan Odell

Odell

Sacred to the memory of Elizabeth Ludlow, wife of George M. Odell, M.D., of Fredericton who died April 19, 1861 in the 35th year of her age. "Them that sleep in Jesus will God bring with him."

George Mountain Odell, M.D., died at Newport, Rhode Island, April 21, 1892 in the 75th year of his age. "I believe in the life everlasting."

Charles Odell, C.E., May 27, 1898. Sadie Odell, Dec. 3, 1910. Erected in loving memory of our dear father and mother.

These three tombstones are surrounded by a stone fence.

G.M. Odell at present at Newport State of Rhode Island claims a lot in the burying lot 18 x 24, situate in the north corner enclosed by a wooden fence set on stones. Purchased from Robert Wood about 1861.

The Honourable and Reverend Jonathan Odell came to New Brunswick in 1783 with the New England Loyalists. A clergyman of the Church of England, he was for many years the government Secretary of the Province. His only son, Hon. William Franklin Odell (1774-1844), also a Loyalist, had four sons: William Hunter, George Mountain, James, and Charles. The house in which they were born and brought up had been built by their grandfather, Rev. Jonathan Odell. Their father, William F. Odell, later built "Rookwood", and the original family home ultimately became a residence for the youngest son, Charles.

George Mountain Odell lived for some time in St. Mary’s on the Caleb Fowler farm, which his father subsequently bequeathed to him in 1844. In 1846 he bought a town house in Brunswick Street from Horatio Nelson Drake and married not long after.

Royal Gazette, Fredericton, NB, 3 November 1847:

Married on Tuesday, the 26th ult. at St. Paul’s Church, Halifax, by the Rev. Dr. Twining, Chaplain of the Garrison, George Mountain Odell M.D., son of the late Hon. W.F. Odell of Fredericton, N.B., to Elizabeth Ludlow, daughter of D.L. Robinson, an uncle of Deputy Commissary General Robinson.

Dr. G.M. Odell married, secondly, Susan Philipse, daughter of Morris Robinson. She was a cousin of the Honourable F.P. Robinson. In 1865, Mrs. George Lee bequeathed to Susan P. Odell, her niece, wife of Dr. George M. Odell, £100, “also her work table and sofa table,” and a portrait of her father Morris Robinson. There is no inscription here in memory of Dr. Odell’s second wife.

New Brunswick Reporter, Fredericton, NB, 27 April 1892:

Intelligence of the death of Dr. Geo. M. Odell at Newport, R.I. last week was heard with sorrow by many of the old families in Fredericton whose physician and friend the deceased had been. Dr. Odell was for many years a leading physician here. His remains were brought to this city Monday and interred in the family enclosure in the old cemetery. The chief mourners were Capt. Odell, nephew of the deceased; Delancy Robinson, F.A.H. Straton and Geo. C. Hunt. Closely following these were all of the city physicians. The pall bearers were Sir John Allen, Judge Fraser, Lt. Col. Maunsell, Andrew Inches, E.H. Wilmot and J. Henry Phair. Capt. Odell was at the bedside for a couple of days before he died and accompanied the remains to the city. Rev. G.G. Roberts performed the last rites at the grave.

Charles Odell, born 16 August 1826, was twice married, first to Maynard Eliza Grange (born 1835) by whom he had two children, Florence Mary and George Grange. In 1867, Charles married, secondly, Sarah, daughter of John D. Kinnear, Judge of Probate for Cumberland County, Nova Scotia. They had five children. His eldest son, George Grange Odell, often visited his father from South America where he worked as an engineer. It is remembered that one of his parrots hid in the Cathedral and disrupted a Sunday service.

Their house, occupied for a hundred years or more by the Odell family, is now the Deanery. It is shown in the first town plat, the plan of which was made by Lieut. Dugald Campbell. Above each of the two upper rooms was a loft or sleeping quarter, entirely separate. The large iron rings bolted into the woodwork were probably placed there to chain deserters during one of the early periods of the movement of troops through Fredericton. Until 1844, this house with gardens, yards, stables, outhouses, together with land in rear, extended to Charlotte Street.

Descendants of John Gregory

Gregory

Sacred to the memory of John Gregory, born in Edinburgh, Scotland, Oct. 13, 1806, died in Fredericton Oct. 29, 1861. Also his wife, Mary Grosvenor, born in Fredericton July 18, 1814, died Nov. 20, 1877.

In loving memory of Lydia Jane, third daughter of John Gregory born June 8, 1851, died Nov. 2, 1928.

Sacred to the memory of Mary Eloise, wife of George Goodrich Fraser and eldest daughter of John and Mary Gregory, born Jan. 30, 1836, died Oct. 21, 1916.

Thomas Archer Gregory, M.D., born Aug. 11, 1834, died June 8, 1881, son of John Gregory.

S. Georgina Archer Gregory, 1856-1940.

IHS Frederick Philipse Robinson, 1855-1931.

Harry Woodforde Gregory, M.D. 1864-1901.

Mildred Kingdon Gregory, died April 5, 1892 aged one year and ten months, daughter of Albert James Gregory, son of John Gregory.

John Simeon Armstrong

Lot #191 was claimed in 1886.

George F. Gregory claims for his brothers and sisters, Mary E. Fraser, W.O. Gregory, Charles C. Gregory, Edward F. Gregory, John Brunswick Gregory, Sarah Ann Dunham, Lydia Jane Gregory, Georgina A. Gregory, Albert J. Gregory, John Gregory, Harry Gregory and Harry Allen a lot 18 x 29 feet. New Part, near Allen Street. Adjoins the Estey lot and is enclosed by an iron railing and marked by a monument to John Gregory.

John Gregory, the head of this family, came from Edinburgh to New Brunswick in 1820. He married Mary A. Grosvenor, fifth daughter of the late Samuel Grosvenor, in September 1833. Her brother, William Grosvenor, sold dry goods and wine on Queen Street.

John and Mary had twelve children: Thomas Archer, Mary Eloise, William Odell, George Frederick, Charles Currie, Sarah Anne, Edward Fulton, John Brunswick, Lydia Jane, Samuel Grosvenor, Georgina Archer, and Albert James. John Gregory bought the home of Dr. Charles Earle, a log cabin, the first building the Loyalists erected. In its modernised form, it was "Acacia Grove," the home of John Gregory’s son, Albert Gregory, Q.C.

John Gregory was fifty-five when he died. He had been a Clerk in the Provincial Secretary’s office since 1825 and for many years clerk assistant in the Legislative Council, "in which capacities he discharged his duties in a most able and efficient manner. Funeral tomorrow, Thursday the 31st instant at 3 o’clock" (Royal Gazette, Fredericton, NB, 30 October 1861).

Thomas Archer Gregory, M.D., was forty-seven when he was thrown from his wagon at City Hall Ferry Landing and killed, the cause a runaway horse. The eldest child of John and Mary, he was married to Lucy Woodforde Smith, who died after 1910 and is buried here with him. They lived on the north side of King Street, about halfway between York and Westmorland. Their son, Dr. Harry Woodforde Gregory, practised at Stanley.

A small stone "IHS" marks the grave of Mary Eloise.

Frederick Philipse Robinson was a son-in-law of John Gregory, having married Georgina ("Georgie"), and lies buried here beside her.

"J.S.A." marks the grave of John Simeon Armstrong, prominent engineer, who married Lydia Jane, third daughter of John and Mary Gregory. He was the son of Rev. George M. Armstrong and his wife Octavia Bowman. He was a member of the contracting firm that built Dorchester Penitentiary, Trinity Church, and City Hall in Saint John after that city’s Great Fire. He was the first engineer to urge the feasibility of dredging and using Courtney Bay, Saint John.

Lydia Jane ("Jeannie") graduated with M.A. Honours from the University of New Brunswick. She was the first teacher appointed under the new school law in New Brunswick and for many years was on the staff of the Collegiate Institute, Fredericton, under the principalship of Dr. George R. Parkin. She established Netherwood, a school for girls at Rothesay of which she was principal and which she successfully conducted for ten years. She retired in 1905, on which occasion she was presented with a handsome testimonial by her pupils.

In memory of Marion Birkmyre, wife of Geo F. Gregory, died 7th Jan., 1871, aged 28 years. Also their daughter, Alice Myrtle, died 22 Dec., 1863, aged 3 months.

Judge George Frederick Gregory was born in Fredericton on 31 August 1839, the son of John and Mary Gregory. He married Marion Birkmyre Beverly (born 1843), a daughter of Francis Beverly, and joined the Presbyterian Church. His parents, brothers, sisters, and children were all members of the Church of England.

Speaking of the 1860 marriage of George F. Gregory, his descendants say, "He was twenty-one, and she was eighteen, and he was a thousand dollars in debt." There were five children of this marriage: Alice Myrtle; Fraser; Mabel, who married Hedley V.B. Bridges; Edith, died 1950; and Gertrude, Mrs. William Alexander MacRae.

George Gregory was admitted an attorney in 1863 and called to the bar in 1865. He was for twenty-two years a partner of A.G. Blair and became a Justice of the Supreme Court of New Brunswick. His home, corner of Church and George Street, stood opposite that of Mr. Blair and was bought by the Cathedral to be a residence for Bishop J.A. Richardson. The Gregory property extended to Charlotte Street.

In 1871, while George F. Gregory was Mayor of Fredericton, his wife Marion died. He was Mayor again (1878-1880) when he married, secondly, Isabella Louisa, widow of Charles J. Davis.

George Pattison, dry goods merchant

Pattison

George Pattison, born at Gateshead, Co. Durham, England, Feb. 24, 1819, died at Fredericton August 2, 1864.

This lone tombstone in memory of George Pattison was originally surrounded by a handsome cast iron fence. He was a merchant and a member of the Church of England. The dry goods business of George Pattison was established before 1840 in Fredericton and after his death in 1864 was continued successfully by Patrick Dever. When George Pattison died, he was sharing living quarters with John James Fraser, barrister, and attended by two servants.

Advertisement, Headquarters, Fredericton, NB, 22 September 1858:

Geo. Pattison & Co. Wholesale & Retail DRY GOODS MERCHANTS "COMMERCE HOUSE" FREDERICTON, July 2, 1856.

Royal Gazette, Fredericton, NB, 1 August 1866:

NEW BRUNSWICK – YORK, TO-WIT. To the Sheriff of the County of York, or any constable within the said County, Greetings: Whereas William H. Robinson, and John James Fraser, the Executors of the last Will and Testament of George Pattison, late of Fredericton, in the County of York, deceased, have filed their accounts as such Executors with the said Estate.

The Mark Needham family

Needham

In memory of Mark Needham who departed this life January 31st 1863 ae 84 years, also Isabella, his wife, died on the 25th day of May 1862 in the 76th year of her age.

Sacred to the memory of W.H. Needham, Esq., Q.C., born at Fredericton, N.B., Dec. 9, 1810, died at Woodstock, N.B., Sept. 29, 1874 ae 63 years. "Requiescat in pace" Also his wife Mary Ann, died at Halifax, N.S., July 17, 1888 aged 70 years.

In memory of Mirianne, widow of Dr. W.R. Fraser, late of Edinburgh, Scotland, died Feb. 8, 1893 in her 81st year.

Our Willie.

“Our Willie,” William Hazen (1853-1860), was the son of William Hazen and Mary Ann (Gale) Needham.

Besides the names of the Needham family inscribed upon the four tombstones, Mark Needham’s youngest daughter, Jane Eliza, died in Fredericton in 1909, at the age of 93, and would have been buried in the family plot. She had been a teacher.

Mrs. M Fraser claims for herself, her sister Jane Eliza Needham, a lot known as the Mark Needham lot. Situate in the westerly part of said ground, enclosed by a wooden paling. This lot [#101] was first assigned to the late Mark Needham, father of the claimants.

Mark Needham, born 1778 in Yorkshire, was the son of an army captain of the 54th Regiment, which was stationed in Fredericton when the city was first laid out. The father died and Mark Needham took on the support of his mother and her three orphaned children. He rose to become a prominent citizen of Fredericton. Needham is the family name of the Earl of Kilmorey, an Irish peerage. The crest of that family is a phoenix, which may account for the origin of Phoenix Square in Fredericton.

In the 1820s, Mark Needham and his family lived in Saint John and he was a member of the St. Andrews Society, 1821-1826. On his return to Fredericton in 1826 he was made an honorary member of that society. In Fredericton he bought town lot #7, part of the old gaol ground. His place of business as an auctioneer was in Carleton Street.

Advertisement, 1837:

Pews for sale: Christ Church, Fredericton, on Saturday, the 19th day of January next at 12 o’clock, will be sold at public auction at the Church several Pews on the ground floor, as also Pews in the Western Gallery. Dated 26th Dec. 1837. Mark Needham auctioneer.

Early in 1822, he was foreman of the jury which brought in a verdict of "not guilty" at the trial of George Frederick Street, Captain John David of the 74th Regiment, and Wentworth Winslow. The charge was murder, George Ludlow Wetmore having been killed on 2 October 1821.

Mark Needham was Treasurer of York County, off and on, until his death in 1863, having been appointed in 1831. He was appointed one of the city assessors in 1848, the year in which Fredericton was incorporated as a city. He was one of the earliest wardens of the first Parish Church (Christ Church) in Fredericton, and was for nine years Quartermaster of the New Brunswick Regiment. He was appointed New Brunswick’s first parliamentary librarian in 1842.

A memorial of Mark Needham, dated 10 April 1804 and addressed to His Royal Highness Field Marshal the Duke of York, Commander in Chief of His Majesty’s Forces etc., states that he was the son of a soldier of the 54th Regiment killed in the American war. Mark Needham himself entered, when very young, the 54th Regiment. By the favour of his commanding officer, he obtained his discharge when the regiment was ordered from New Brunswick. He was burdened with the support of two sisters and a brother. He joined the Provincial Regiment when it was raised in 1793 and in the course of nine years’ service he rose through the ranks of Fifer, Corporal, Sergeant, and Paymaster’s clerk, until his Excellency General Carleton (then Colonel of the Regiment) was pleased to promote him to the Quartermastercy.

There was difficulty about obtaining half-pay for Mark Needham. On 7 November 1804, William Hazen wrote on his behalf to Edward Winslow, then in London:

Winslow Papers, p. 552:

As I feel anxious to do everything that can serve a young man of great industry and merit, and as I know what your dispositions and have been on similar occasions, I am confident… Mr. Needham has lately been so unfortunate as to lose an adventure worth an hundred pounds by the singular accident of a Brig being burnt in port at Jamaica. This has taken nearly all the industrious scrapings of his last nine years service, that the support and education of his mother and her orphans had left him.

However, Mark Needham did not receive half-pay. Instead, in 1819, he was granted 500 acres in Carleton County in the 2nd tier west of the St. John River.

Mark Needham married Isabella, a sister of James Fraser, a well-to-do ship owner and trader who had married a daughter of Dr. Charles Earle. Their children were William Hazen (born 1810), Mirianne (born 1812), Isabella Fraser, Jane Eliza (born 10 March 1816, died unmarried 25 September 1909), and Mark Robert, who was born 12 December 1818 and baptised 4 April 1819, according to the Parish Church Register.

The eldest Needham daughter, Mirianne, married Dr. W.R. Fraser, and survived her husband by nearly fifty years. She later resided on St. John Street in Fredericton. Her son, Donald St. George Fraser, married as his second wife, Mary, the daughter of John Gregory and a sister of Albert Gregory, Q.C.

Royal Gazette, Fredericton, NB, 15 May 1844:

Died at 8 Garner’s Crescent, Edinburgh, on Sunday, April 7th, William Fraser, Esquire, Surgeon, aged 36 years, sincerely regretted by all who knew him… Dr. Fraser having during a long period of Professional usefulness in this town gained for himself the high respect and regard of all classes of the community.

Mark Needham’s daughter Isabella married Isaac Woodward Jouet on 28 December 1833. Isaac Jouet predeceased his father, Xenophon Jouet, who had been Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod 1784-1831. When Isabella Jouet was widowed, she taught school. Her three children, Gertrude Garrison, Mark Robert, and Isaac Woodward, lived with her brother, William H. Needham.

Isabella Jouet was married a second time, 21 June 1843, to Benjamin Yerxa of Keswick, a merchant and farmer born in 1802. He was of Dutch extraction, and one of the first of his considerable connection to leave the Church of England and become a Baptist. He was a widower with eight children from his first marriage to Jemima Sisson. He and Isabella had two children, Henry D. Yerxa, who married Sarah Emery, and Edward. They settled in Boston sometime before Benjamin’s death in 1888, and at least two of his grandchildren settled there also.

William Hazen Needham, Mark Needham’s son, attended King’s College, Fredericton, and read law in the office of George Frederick Street. He was admitted to the New Brunswick Bar in 1834 and practised for a short time in Woodstock.

Notice, October 1835:

Needham-Gale. By the Rev. Dr. Gray, William H. Needham, Esquire, of Woodstock, Barrister at Law, to Miss Mary Ann, second daughter of Mr. Benjamin Gale, of St. John.

Mary Ann’s family was from Saint John, where W.H. Needham had spent his youth. She was a sister of James Gale who had then recently settled in Fredericton where he was to become the foremost druggist of his day. A sister conducted a school for ladies in Saint John and, later, when she was Mrs. Hunt, did so in Fredericton.

W.H. and Mary Ann Needham had ten children, nine of whom survived their father: Isabel Ford (born 1838), Margaret Helen (born 1839), Mary Louise Kemmis (born 1840), Henry Mark (born 1843), James White (born 1848), George Clarence (born 1854), Florence Maude (born 1858), Robert Bruce (born 1861), and John Gale (born 1863). William Hazen (1853-1860) is "Our Willie" buried here.

Soon after his marriage, W.H. Needham practised law in Saint John. He was Mayor in 1849 and elected a member of the Legislature for City of Saint John in 1850. W.H. "Billy" Needham was an outstanding man of his time and came of a clever family, as did his wife. His natural ability benefited from association with the most highly trained and experienced legal minds in the Province, having read law in Fredericton with the Honourable George Street, and in the 1850s, upon his return to Fredericton, he became a partner in law of Hon. John Ambrose Street, long the senior Q.C. in the Province.

In 1854, a bill was laid before the New Brunswick Assembly to abolish King’s College, now the University of New Brunswick. It was through the influence of Hon. John Ambrose Street and the eloquence of L.A. Wilmot, Charles Fisher, and W.H. Needham that the college was saved, not forgetting that the Superintendent of Education, Marshall d’Avray, became owner and publisher of the Headquarters, a Fredericton newspaper, in the fight to retain higher education.

Needham was four times Mayor of Fredericton between 1855 and 1868, with the exception of 1859-1861 when James S. Beek held that office. In his first civic election in March 1855, W.H. Needham received 381 votes and his opponent, G.F.H. Minchin, 274 votes. He was a short man, not more than five feet tall, a brilliant speaker and noted for his wit. Many good stories are credited to him. He was popular everywhere, and a prominent member of the Cathedral congregation.

"A Trip to New Brunswick," Cort correspondence, 1870:

…Twenty-four miles from Fredericton, Ox and Major Islands divide the river into three channels. We take the right and approach the little parish of Sheffield. Here a boat hails us and we take on board Judge Fisher and Hon. W.H. Needham of Fredericton, the latter a veritable Jack Falstaff.