The family of George Harding, Maugerville Loyalist

Harding

John Harding, born March 1st, 1774, died January 9th, 1866

Sarah Harding, born April 29th, 1776, died August 5th, 1858

John Harding in 1851 was a farmer and his three-storey house was the largest in St. Mary’s. He was very well off and acquired a great deal of property. In 1851 he and his wife, Sarah Barker, were living alone.

John Harding was brought to New Brunswick by his father, George Harding (c.1744-1808), Loyalist. In 1783 George Harding purchased Lot 74 in Maugerville from Samuel and Sarah Bridges, and he was listed in the Sunbury County Poll Book, 1795, with home and freehold in Maugerville. Mrs. Harding, "consort of George Harding," died in 1795.

George Harding deeded his slave Sippeo to his son John, "to be his property and his heirs and successors during the life of the said negro…." The indenture was dated 1784 and signed in 1802 by the Justice of the Peace at Maugerville, Elijah Miles. This interesting document was given to the Legislative Library, Fredericton and is framed. John Harding willed his slaves to his sister, Elizabeth, the second wife of the Loyalist Captain Elijah Miles. Sippeo became the verger of Christ Church, Maugerville.

The names George, John, and William appear frequently in the various branches of the Harding family, who came from Derry, Ireland by way of Newburgh, New York,. Another George Harding, 1770-1843, settled near Saint John and married Jane Spragg (or Sprague) at Belleisle, NB. He was the son of Capt. William Harding (1745-1818), who is buried at the Loyalist Cemetery, Saint John, and his wife, Leah Sarah Gillies. William Harding seems to have been the brother of the George Harding who settled in Maugerville.

Jonathan George Harding in 1846 was a cabinetmaker. Payments for work done while renovating the Assembly Room (Journals of the House of Assembly, 1846) included: J.G. Harding, for making tables for the Assembly Room; Thomas Armstrong, for making carpet; Thomas Aiken, cutting and laying down carpet repairing desks; T.C. Everett, stove and pipe; Thomas Stewart, coal scuttles; Spafford Barker, firearms; William Morgan, grates for the Assembly Room; and Justin Spahnn, repairing clock and care thereof.

Abraham Henry Clark, builder

Clark

In memory of A. Henry Clark, died in Fredericton, July 11th, 1865 aged 56 years and his wife Christianna, died Feb. 5th, 1887 age 79 years.

Also their son Edwin B. who died at Jacksonville, Florida, April 4, 1871 in the 27th year of his age.

Footstones: “Mother” and “Father.”

Lot #44, 10 x 12 feet, was purchased in 1866 and contains one large stone inscribed on two sides. The engraved symbol on the top of Edwin Clark’s epitaph is an anchor and rope. There were five graves here enclosed by wooden paling painted black. Besides the graves of A. Henry Clark and his wife and son, there are two unmarked graves: Louisa Augusta, born 1 December 1837, died 22 August 1918; and George Samuel Clark, born 7 May 1846, died 12 December 1922.

Abraham Henry Clark, born 19 May 1807, was the eldest son of Samuel Clark and his wife Abigail Jewett. He was born on the farm at Keswick Ridge and became a house builder in Fredericton and was one of the best.

He married, on 7 May 1835, Christianna ("Ann") Bain, born 6 August 1808. This marriage was one of the first performed under the new law which permitted dissenting clergymen in New Brunswick to perform the marriage ceremony. Christianna Bain was of Scottish descent and a devout Christian. Prior to her death she was an invalid for some years.

Henry Clark brought his bride to a large house which he bought and improved — the King Street property of Thomas Everett. He subsequently built two houses in George Street.

The children of Henry and Christianna were Henry Bradford (1836-1921), Louisa Augusta (1837-1918), Charles Frederick (1841-1927), Edwin B. (1845-1871), and George Samuel (1846-1922).

Henry Bradford, the eldest son, a builder like his father, married Hannah Barker, daughter of Andrew Ritchie, also a noted builder of houses. She was a granddaughter of William Anderson, High Sheriff of York County (1801-1811), a noted Loyalist and a trader. His father, John Anderson, long connected with Nova Scotia as a trader and once a rival of Hazen, Simonds & White, bequeathed to his son William Anderson the 10,000-acre Monckton Grant and a tremendous debt. Henry Bradford Clark built the house in George Street, now numbered 759, in which he and his wife first resided and reared a family.

Miss Louisa Augusta and her youngest brother, George, remained unmarried and resided together for many years in one of the houses built by their father on George Street opposite the Old Burying Ground. George was employed by the Fred Edgecombe company for years as manager of one of the departments in the store.

The family of Edward Yardy, King’s Printer

Yardy

Sacred to the memory of Mary Yardy, died April 11, 1871, aged 83 years. "Though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death I will fear no evil for Thou art with me. Thy rod and Thy staff will comfort me."

William Yardy died Dec. 25 1863, aged 85 years.

Sacred to the memory of Edward Yardy, died Aug. 24, 1901, aged 89 years. "Blessed are the pure in heart for they shall see God.

Sacred to the memory of Catherine, wife of Edward Yardy, died Nov. 25 1883, aged 66 years. "Her children rise up and call her blessed."

Mary Ellen d. of Edward and Catherine died Aug. 30, 1843, ae 3 months.

Separate headstones. This plot was purchased by Edward Yardy from Henry Chestnut.

Edward Yardy, born 1814, came to Fredericton from Ireland with his parents, Mary and William, in 1821. He was a printer in the office of the King’s Printer. Edward Yardy was married in 1841 to Catherine Smith. The family home was on St. John Street, adjacent to the site of the Farrell brick house. Edward Yardy’s parents lived with their son.

Edward and Catherine Yard’s fourth daughter, Julia Alice, married Charles Victor Twiss of Boston in 1874.  Another daughter married Charles Archibald Welsh (or Welch) who was the son of carpenter Anthony Welch, for some time verger of the Parish Church, Fredericton.

Fredericton Evening Capital, Fredericton, NB, 16 October 1884:

Edward Yardy’s connection with the printing business in this Province extends over a period of 65 years. He entered the office of the ‘Star’ published in Saint John city by Mr. Younghusband and subsequently went with Mr. Seeds & Cameron who took the ‘Star’ and afterwards published the ‘Observer’. In 1837, he went to Fredericton and entered the ‘Royal Gazette’ office, then published by the late Mr. Simpson. Mr. Yardy was foreman of the Gazette for a number of years. Mr. Yardy and his two daughters with his son, who had come from Boston to accompany them to their new home, left this morn. for that city.

New Brunswick Reporter and Fredericton Advertiser, Fredericton, NB, 5 September 1885:

Death of a Fredericton boy – Intelligence has been received of the death of C. Archie WELSH at his home in Beverly near Boston, Mass. The cause of his death was heart disease. His wife was the daughter of Edward YARDY, lately of this city. The Boston ‘Post’ says that he constructed some of the finest buildings in Boston among them being the New Old South Church, the palatial residence of Martin Brimmer, the Art Museum and the St. John’s Memorial Church, Cambridge. He was 53 years old and leaves a widow and son.

Carleton Sentinel, Woodstock, NB, 11 July 1896:

Edward Yardy, Boston, Mass. is visiting his daughter Mrs. W.H. Everett of this town. He is accompanied by his daughter, Susie Yardy. Mr. Yardy was be remembered as the veteran printer, who was foreman of the ‘Royal Gazette’, Fredericton for over half a century. He is now in his 88th [?] year, but is hale and hearty.

Everett and Stewart, trustees of St. Paul’s Church

Stewart

STEWART "I am the resurrection and the life". Thomas Stewart, born at Newton Stewart, Scotland, 23rd Nov. 1791, died 8th April 1870.

Elizabeth, his wife, died 21st Sept. 1862, aged 65 years.

Their children, Margaret, died 27th January, 1849, aged 21 years — James died 23rd January, 1852, aged 18 years — Charles, died at Havana 21st Aug., 1859, aged 25 years

Their grandchild, Thomas Stewart, infant son of Z.R. Everett and Helen T. Everett, died 12th Aug., 1863.

John K. Stewart, died in Montana, Oct. 28th, 1885.

W.R. Stewart, died at Nceumea, South Pacific, 1873.

When St. Paul’s Church was incorporated, Thomas Stewart and Thomas Everett were two of the first trustees. Thomas Stewart had several sons and one surviving daughter, Helen. She married Zebedee Ring Everett, a nephew of Thomas Everett and a grandson of Thomas Everett, Loyalist, who died in 1814. Zebedee R. Everett, a merchant, was an alderman in 1871. He was the paternal grandfather of the Misses Everett, Isabel, Bessie, and Winnie, sisters of the infant Thomas Everett buried here.