Adams, Beckwith, Grigor, and Hart

Hart / Hartt

George Henry Hart born 1796 – 1877

Julia Catherine Hart born 10 March 1796 – 20 Nov. 1867

Marvin F. Hart born 1823 – 1902

Jane Hart born 1826 – 25 May 1865

Mary Grigor born [?] – Feb. 12, 1903

John Burnside Beckwith infant 1872

Harriet Augusta Beckwith born 1868 – April, 1872

William Adams [?] – 1851

Jane Adams [?] – 1861

Anne [?] – 1861

Charles [?] – 1868

James born 1849 – 1891

Beginning at George Street the first lot, 14 x 16 feet, was originally enclosed within an ornamental iron fence, with two gates, beautifully intact in 1955. Upon one gate was impressed “F. Marvin Hart, 1865.” This lot was owned by both the Hart and Adams families. It is quite likely that at least twelve bodies lie buried here. There were several monuments, some of each family.

Jackson Adams was a prosperous undertaker with a furniture business in Court House Square. Jackson Adams claimed one half of this lot in 1886, and his relatives are buried in that half on George Street. His wife was Elizabeth.

John, the father of Jackson Adams, born in Paisley, Scotland, had run away from home as a young man. John Adams came from a fine family, related to John Quincy Adams, a President of the United States. He was employed at Limavady, Northern Ireland, by a Mr. Jackson as gardener and groom. He drove the dog cart, the passenger and driver sitting back to back. Margaret Jackson, the daughter, fell in love with him and they eloped in 1822. Their eldest child, Jackson, was born 18 April 1824, at sea.

The remainder of the lot belonged to the Honourable J.A. Beckwith, the lot having been purchased by him in 1866.

It is puzzling that an official certificate of ownership was issued to F. Marvin Hart in August 1866. It was “purchased from Henry Chestnut by the Claimer. A receipt is held for payment.” In 1865, Marvin Hart buried his young wife, Jane Elizabeth Grigor, here. She was a granddaughter of Dr. Charles Earle who is buried elsewhere in the graveyard.

The two Beckwith children buried here are the grandchildren of the Hon. John A. Beckwith.

The Honourable John A. Beckwith descended paternally from the family of Beckwith, Norwich, England, and maternally from C.L. Le Brun de du Plessis, a relative of Armand du Plessis, Cardinal duc de Richelieu.

Born at Fredericton on 1 December 1800, John A. Beckwith was educated there and at Toronto, Montreal, and Windsor, Nova Scotia. He married, first, Annie L. Jouett, and secondly Maria A. Berton, both of Fredericton. He was a Mayor of Fredericton, Deputy Commissioner of Crown Lands and Surveyor General, Chairman of the Provincial Board of Agriculture, Director of the Quebec and New Brunswick Railway, and Major, 1st Battalion York County Militia. He was a member of the Executive Council and Provincial Secretary and Registrar (1867-1871). He sat for York County in the New Brunswick Assembly (1866-1874), when called to the Legislative Council.

F. Marvin Hart was a nephew of John A. Beckwith. He was a son of George Henry Hart and his wife Julia Catherine Beckwith Hart, Canada’s first published novelist.

Julia C. Beckwith was a daughter of Nehemiah Beckwith, a trader of Maugerville, who was drowned near Sheffield in 1818. Her mother was Julie-Louise Le Brun de Duplessis, daughter of Jean Baptiste Le Brun de Duplessis, one of Montcalm’s staff. She was brought to Fredericton as governess to Governor Carleton’s children. Julia was born in Fredericton in 1796 and spent much of her early life visiting her father’s relatives in Cornwallis Valley, Nova Scotia, and travelling by canoe along the St. John River to her mother’s relatives in Quebec. It was on one of these trips that she began her literary career with St. Ursula’s Convent, a story based on the experiences of a relative with the nuns. Following the death of her husband, Nehemiah, Julie-Louise took her family to Montreal and Kingston where they visited her relatives, returning after five or six years.

In Kingston, on 3 January 1822, Julia Catherine Beckwith married George Henry Hart, a bookbinder, and they resided there for a time. She completed her first novel. St. Ursula’s Convent; or, the Nun of Canada, Containing Scenes from Real Life (Kingston, Upper Canada, printed by Hugh C. Thomson, 1824, Boards, 2 Vols.) was published in Toronto. Four copies are known to exist: one in the Toronto Public Library, one in the Congressional Library, and two in the library of the University of New Brunswick. A second novel, Tonnawanda; or The Adopted Son of America, An Indian Story (Rochester, New York), was published sometime between 1826 and 1831. About 1826 the Harts moved to Rochester, New York, and in 1831 to Fredericton where Julia resided the rest of her life. George Henry Hart, her husband, was employed in the Crown Land Department. For many years she contributed to The Reporter.

George and Julia Hart had a family of seven children: Adolphus; Nehemiah Beckwith; James; F. Marvin, buried here; Charles L.; Julia, born in Fredericton 1838; and Theodore, born 1840.

F. Marvin Hart married Jane Elizabeth Grigor. The couple had two children: a son, Grigor Jonff, and a daughter, Marianne. They lived in the James Grigor “cottage,” the second house east of St. Dunstan’s Church, which survived a terrible fire in 1850. It was estimated that three hundred buildings were burned. Owing to the frantic exertions of the parishioners, the Church and this small cottage were saved. In 1862, F. Marvin Hart opened a clothing store, The Bee Hive, and operated it for half a century. According to Cathedral records, Jane Grigor Hart died in May 1865 aged 39. Late in the century, Marvin, then an old man, moved to Saint John where he lived out the rest of his life with his wife’s sister, Mary Grigor.

Herald, Fredericton, NB, 13 February 1903:

Miss Mary Grigor, a sister of the late Mrs. Hart (Jane) died in St. John yesterday at the home of her niece Mrs. Frank H. White. The remains will arrive here tomorrow morning, and will be interred in the old burying ground.

The Mark Needham family

Needham

In memory of Mark Needham who departed this life January 31st 1863 ae 84 years, also Isabella, his wife, died on the 25th day of May 1862 in the 76th year of her age.

Sacred to the memory of W.H. Needham, Esq., Q.C., born at Fredericton, N.B., Dec. 9, 1810, died at Woodstock, N.B., Sept. 29, 1874 ae 63 years. "Requiescat in pace" Also his wife Mary Ann, died at Halifax, N.S., July 17, 1888 aged 70 years.

In memory of Mirianne, widow of Dr. W.R. Fraser, late of Edinburgh, Scotland, died Feb. 8, 1893 in her 81st year.

Our Willie.

“Our Willie,” William Hazen (1853-1860), was the son of William Hazen and Mary Ann (Gale) Needham.

Besides the names of the Needham family inscribed upon the four tombstones, Mark Needham’s youngest daughter, Jane Eliza, died in Fredericton in 1909, at the age of 93, and would have been buried in the family plot. She had been a teacher.

Mrs. M Fraser claims for herself, her sister Jane Eliza Needham, a lot known as the Mark Needham lot. Situate in the westerly part of said ground, enclosed by a wooden paling. This lot [#101] was first assigned to the late Mark Needham, father of the claimants.

Mark Needham, born 1778 in Yorkshire, was the son of an army captain of the 54th Regiment, which was stationed in Fredericton when the city was first laid out. The father died and Mark Needham took on the support of his mother and her three orphaned children. He rose to become a prominent citizen of Fredericton. Needham is the family name of the Earl of Kilmorey, an Irish peerage. The crest of that family is a phoenix, which may account for the origin of Phoenix Square in Fredericton.

In the 1820s, Mark Needham and his family lived in Saint John and he was a member of the St. Andrews Society, 1821-1826. On his return to Fredericton in 1826 he was made an honorary member of that society. In Fredericton he bought town lot #7, part of the old gaol ground. His place of business as an auctioneer was in Carleton Street.

Advertisement, 1837:

Pews for sale: Christ Church, Fredericton, on Saturday, the 19th day of January next at 12 o’clock, will be sold at public auction at the Church several Pews on the ground floor, as also Pews in the Western Gallery. Dated 26th Dec. 1837. Mark Needham auctioneer.

Early in 1822, he was foreman of the jury which brought in a verdict of "not guilty" at the trial of George Frederick Street, Captain John David of the 74th Regiment, and Wentworth Winslow. The charge was murder, George Ludlow Wetmore having been killed on 2 October 1821.

Mark Needham was Treasurer of York County, off and on, until his death in 1863, having been appointed in 1831. He was appointed one of the city assessors in 1848, the year in which Fredericton was incorporated as a city. He was one of the earliest wardens of the first Parish Church (Christ Church) in Fredericton, and was for nine years Quartermaster of the New Brunswick Regiment. He was appointed New Brunswick’s first parliamentary librarian in 1842.

A memorial of Mark Needham, dated 10 April 1804 and addressed to His Royal Highness Field Marshal the Duke of York, Commander in Chief of His Majesty’s Forces etc., states that he was the son of a soldier of the 54th Regiment killed in the American war. Mark Needham himself entered, when very young, the 54th Regiment. By the favour of his commanding officer, he obtained his discharge when the regiment was ordered from New Brunswick. He was burdened with the support of two sisters and a brother. He joined the Provincial Regiment when it was raised in 1793 and in the course of nine years’ service he rose through the ranks of Fifer, Corporal, Sergeant, and Paymaster’s clerk, until his Excellency General Carleton (then Colonel of the Regiment) was pleased to promote him to the Quartermastercy.

There was difficulty about obtaining half-pay for Mark Needham. On 7 November 1804, William Hazen wrote on his behalf to Edward Winslow, then in London:

Winslow Papers, p. 552:

As I feel anxious to do everything that can serve a young man of great industry and merit, and as I know what your dispositions and have been on similar occasions, I am confident… Mr. Needham has lately been so unfortunate as to lose an adventure worth an hundred pounds by the singular accident of a Brig being burnt in port at Jamaica. This has taken nearly all the industrious scrapings of his last nine years service, that the support and education of his mother and her orphans had left him.

However, Mark Needham did not receive half-pay. Instead, in 1819, he was granted 500 acres in Carleton County in the 2nd tier west of the St. John River.

Mark Needham married Isabella, a sister of James Fraser, a well-to-do ship owner and trader who had married a daughter of Dr. Charles Earle. Their children were William Hazen (born 1810), Mirianne (born 1812), Isabella Fraser, Jane Eliza (born 10 March 1816, died unmarried 25 September 1909), and Mark Robert, who was born 12 December 1818 and baptised 4 April 1819, according to the Parish Church Register.

The eldest Needham daughter, Mirianne, married Dr. W.R. Fraser, and survived her husband by nearly fifty years. She later resided on St. John Street in Fredericton. Her son, Donald St. George Fraser, married as his second wife, Mary, the daughter of John Gregory and a sister of Albert Gregory, Q.C.

Royal Gazette, Fredericton, NB, 15 May 1844:

Died at 8 Garner’s Crescent, Edinburgh, on Sunday, April 7th, William Fraser, Esquire, Surgeon, aged 36 years, sincerely regretted by all who knew him… Dr. Fraser having during a long period of Professional usefulness in this town gained for himself the high respect and regard of all classes of the community.

Mark Needham’s daughter Isabella married Isaac Woodward Jouet on 28 December 1833. Isaac Jouet predeceased his father, Xenophon Jouet, who had been Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod 1784-1831. When Isabella Jouet was widowed, she taught school. Her three children, Gertrude Garrison, Mark Robert, and Isaac Woodward, lived with her brother, William H. Needham.

Isabella Jouet was married a second time, 21 June 1843, to Benjamin Yerxa of Keswick, a merchant and farmer born in 1802. He was of Dutch extraction, and one of the first of his considerable connection to leave the Church of England and become a Baptist. He was a widower with eight children from his first marriage to Jemima Sisson. He and Isabella had two children, Henry D. Yerxa, who married Sarah Emery, and Edward. They settled in Boston sometime before Benjamin’s death in 1888, and at least two of his grandchildren settled there also.

William Hazen Needham, Mark Needham’s son, attended King’s College, Fredericton, and read law in the office of George Frederick Street. He was admitted to the New Brunswick Bar in 1834 and practised for a short time in Woodstock.

Notice, October 1835:

Needham-Gale. By the Rev. Dr. Gray, William H. Needham, Esquire, of Woodstock, Barrister at Law, to Miss Mary Ann, second daughter of Mr. Benjamin Gale, of St. John.

Mary Ann’s family was from Saint John, where W.H. Needham had spent his youth. She was a sister of James Gale who had then recently settled in Fredericton where he was to become the foremost druggist of his day. A sister conducted a school for ladies in Saint John and, later, when she was Mrs. Hunt, did so in Fredericton.

W.H. and Mary Ann Needham had ten children, nine of whom survived their father: Isabel Ford (born 1838), Margaret Helen (born 1839), Mary Louise Kemmis (born 1840), Henry Mark (born 1843), James White (born 1848), George Clarence (born 1854), Florence Maude (born 1858), Robert Bruce (born 1861), and John Gale (born 1863). William Hazen (1853-1860) is "Our Willie" buried here.

Soon after his marriage, W.H. Needham practised law in Saint John. He was Mayor in 1849 and elected a member of the Legislature for City of Saint John in 1850. W.H. "Billy" Needham was an outstanding man of his time and came of a clever family, as did his wife. His natural ability benefited from association with the most highly trained and experienced legal minds in the Province, having read law in Fredericton with the Honourable George Street, and in the 1850s, upon his return to Fredericton, he became a partner in law of Hon. John Ambrose Street, long the senior Q.C. in the Province.

In 1854, a bill was laid before the New Brunswick Assembly to abolish King’s College, now the University of New Brunswick. It was through the influence of Hon. John Ambrose Street and the eloquence of L.A. Wilmot, Charles Fisher, and W.H. Needham that the college was saved, not forgetting that the Superintendent of Education, Marshall d’Avray, became owner and publisher of the Headquarters, a Fredericton newspaper, in the fight to retain higher education.

Needham was four times Mayor of Fredericton between 1855 and 1868, with the exception of 1859-1861 when James S. Beek held that office. In his first civic election in March 1855, W.H. Needham received 381 votes and his opponent, G.F.H. Minchin, 274 votes. He was a short man, not more than five feet tall, a brilliant speaker and noted for his wit. Many good stories are credited to him. He was popular everywhere, and a prominent member of the Cathedral congregation.

"A Trip to New Brunswick," Cort correspondence, 1870:

…Twenty-four miles from Fredericton, Ox and Major Islands divide the river into three channels. We take the right and approach the little parish of Sheffield. Here a boat hails us and we take on board Judge Fisher and Hon. W.H. Needham of Fredericton, the latter a veritable Jack Falstaff.

The Honourable Gabriel George Ludlow

Ludlow

The Honourable Gabriel George Ludlow (1736-1808) is thought to be buried here. He had resided in Queens County, Long Island, New York, and had commanded a militia there. In 1776 he raised a battalion in General DeLancey’s Brigade. His brother, George Duncan Ludlow, became the first Chief Justice of New Brunswick. The two brothers were the only Loyalists of their family.

When he came to New Brunswick, Gabriel Ludlow resided in Saint John. He claimed compensation for the forfeiture in America of over a hundred acres next to the property of his father and the loss of his vessel, his wife and their furniture, books, wearing apparel, linen, sterling, etc. all lost in the Bay of Fundy on the voyage to New Brunswick. He received half-pay as a colonel.

Gabriel Ludlow became Saint John’s first mayor and was among the first appointed members of His Majesty’s Council. He was also Colonel of Militia in New Brunswick. When Governor Carleton departed, Gabriel Ludlow was appointed President of His Majesty’s Council and Commander-in-Chief on 5 October 1803. He died in office in February 1808, aged 72.