The family of Major Henry A. Cropley and Mary Thorburn

Cropley

Sacred to the memory of Major H. A. Cropley, 1838-1906. May Cropley, 1844-1919. Caroline, 1866-1868. Elizabeth J. 1871-1874. Arthur, 1874-78. Alfred A., 1877-1901. Albert, 1877-1877. Mary Y. 1881-1899. Susan, 1885-1899. Children of Henry and May Cropley.

Footstones: “Father,”and “Mother.”

Lot #26, 11 x 13, was purchased about 1871 from Henry Chestnut. The large tombstone with inscriptions on its west and south face stands in a lot fenced with iron paling along George Street and along Jewett’s Lane (Sunbury Street). On the iron gate is "CROPLEY".

Henry Cropley was editor and publisher of the Fredericton Capital, a popular weekly newspaper that was begun in 1882 and continued for many years. It was published at the corner of Queen and Regent Streets, upstairs. A painted sign, "JOB PRINTING A. CROPLEY BOOK BINDING PRINTING," was visible on the brick wall facing Regent Street for almost a century. The building has been demolished.

Henry A. Cropley was a Major in the 71st York County Militia, and a very keen officer. His wife was Mary ("May") Thorburn of Stanley, New Brunswick.

Colonial Farmer, Fredericton, NB, 12 October 1863:

m. 7th inst., by Rev. Dr. Brooke, at residence of Jas. TATTERSALL, brother-in-law of the bride, Henry A. CROPLEY, Printer of Boston City / Mary second d/o Robert THORBURN of Fredericton city (York Co.)

The Gleaner, Fredericton, NB, 9 April 1895:

The veterans of 1866 will meet at Edgar’s restaraunt tomorrow night to commemorate the anniversary of their participation in quelling the Fenian at St. Andrews in 1866. Among those who will be present are Lt. Col. MAUNSELL, Lt. Col. MARSH, Lt. Col. HEWITSON, Major LOGGIE, Major CROPLEY, Ex. Mayor BECKWITH and City Clerk BECKWITH and many others.

The Gleaner, Fredericton, NB, 22 May 1895:

Miss Alice Cropley returned yesterday from Waltham, Mass. where she has been studying for a trained nurse in the hospital there and will spend a vacation with her parents, Major Cropley and Mrs. Cropley.

The Gleaner, Fredericton, NB, 21 December 1896:

Miss Alice CROPLEY, who has been during the past ten months, Supt. of the Dixie Hospital and Training School for Nursers, at Hampton, Virginia, is at home spending her vacation.

Alice Cropley, Mrs. Thomas Allen, lived on University Avenue, and she took pride in her father’s uniforms and sword. Her husband, a son of Sir John Allen, the Chief Justice, was a builder and had built the house she lived in. The house at the rear of the residence was originally used as his work area. This building was later occupied by Lucy Jarvis, a well-known New Brunswick artist. Mrs. Allen died 10 March 1956 and is buried in Springhill beside her husband.

Thomas James Beckett, lost in the woods

Beckett

Sacred to the memory of Thomas James Beckett, a native of England, aged 21 years, who fell asleep in the Lord in the woods near Springfield in September, 1863. "Blessed are the dead that die in the Lord for they rest from their labours."

Helen M. born Oct. 8th 1872, died May 20th 1874. Daughter of Charles W. and M. Helen Beckwith.

The Beckett stone is in a large lot surrounded by a handsome cast-iron fence.

Thomas James Beckett was a son of one of the London directors of the New Brunswick and Nova Scotia Land Company. When young Beckett arrived in Fredericton from England, he went directly to the home of John A. Beckwith, Commissioner in New Brunswick for the company. Mrs. Beckwith told him that her husband had taken a party to Southampton to run out some lines for the company. When Mr. Beckwith returned some days later, his wife asked him where young Beckett was, and Mr. Beckwith asked, "Who’s Beckett?" The survey party went back at once and made a fruitless search of the woods. Help was obtained from Fredericton and the regiment was called out. Mr. Beckwith offered a reward of one hundred dollars, but it was about six weeks later when a farmer by the name of Jesse Clark found the body. Thomas James Beckett had fallen over a log, broken his kneecap, and perished.

Cathedral records:

Thomas Beckett of Norfolk, England buried Dec. 8, 1863. Lost in the woods in Sept. 1863.

The little child, Helen, a granddaughter of the Honourable John A. Beckwith, was buried in the Beckett lot eleven years later. Charles W. Beckwith, her father, was a barrister and for many years city clerk of Fredericton. His wife was Mary Helen Glazier. The Beckett family in England objected to the burial and the lot remains otherwise unused.

Adams, Beckwith, Grigor, and Hart

Hart / Hartt

George Henry Hart born 1796 – 1877

Julia Catherine Hart born 10 March 1796 – 20 Nov. 1867

Marvin F. Hart born 1823 – 1902

Jane Hart born 1826 – 25 May 1865

Mary Grigor born [?] – Feb. 12, 1903

John Burnside Beckwith infant 1872

Harriet Augusta Beckwith born 1868 – April, 1872

William Adams [?] – 1851

Jane Adams [?] – 1861

Anne [?] – 1861

Charles [?] – 1868

James born 1849 – 1891

Beginning at George Street the first lot, 14 x 16 feet, was originally enclosed within an ornamental iron fence, with two gates, beautifully intact in 1955. Upon one gate was impressed “F. Marvin Hart, 1865.” This lot was owned by both the Hart and Adams families. It is quite likely that at least twelve bodies lie buried here. There were several monuments, some of each family.

Jackson Adams was a prosperous undertaker with a furniture business in Court House Square. Jackson Adams claimed one half of this lot in 1886, and his relatives are buried in that half on George Street. His wife was Elizabeth.

John, the father of Jackson Adams, born in Paisley, Scotland, had run away from home as a young man. John Adams came from a fine family, related to John Quincy Adams, a President of the United States. He was employed at Limavady, Northern Ireland, by a Mr. Jackson as gardener and groom. He drove the dog cart, the passenger and driver sitting back to back. Margaret Jackson, the daughter, fell in love with him and they eloped in 1822. Their eldest child, Jackson, was born 18 April 1824, at sea.

The remainder of the lot belonged to the Honourable J.A. Beckwith, the lot having been purchased by him in 1866.

It is puzzling that an official certificate of ownership was issued to F. Marvin Hart in August 1866. It was “purchased from Henry Chestnut by the Claimer. A receipt is held for payment.” In 1865, Marvin Hart buried his young wife, Jane Elizabeth Grigor, here. She was a granddaughter of Dr. Charles Earle who is buried elsewhere in the graveyard.

The two Beckwith children buried here are the grandchildren of the Hon. John A. Beckwith.

The Honourable John A. Beckwith descended paternally from the family of Beckwith, Norwich, England, and maternally from C.L. Le Brun de du Plessis, a relative of Armand du Plessis, Cardinal duc de Richelieu.

Born at Fredericton on 1 December 1800, John A. Beckwith was educated there and at Toronto, Montreal, and Windsor, Nova Scotia. He married, first, Annie L. Jouett, and secondly Maria A. Berton, both of Fredericton. He was a Mayor of Fredericton, Deputy Commissioner of Crown Lands and Surveyor General, Chairman of the Provincial Board of Agriculture, Director of the Quebec and New Brunswick Railway, and Major, 1st Battalion York County Militia. He was a member of the Executive Council and Provincial Secretary and Registrar (1867-1871). He sat for York County in the New Brunswick Assembly (1866-1874), when called to the Legislative Council.

F. Marvin Hart was a nephew of John A. Beckwith. He was a son of George Henry Hart and his wife Julia Catherine Beckwith Hart, Canada’s first published novelist.

Julia C. Beckwith was a daughter of Nehemiah Beckwith, a trader of Maugerville, who was drowned near Sheffield in 1818. Her mother was Julie-Louise Le Brun de Duplessis, daughter of Jean Baptiste Le Brun de Duplessis, one of Montcalm’s staff. She was brought to Fredericton as governess to Governor Carleton’s children. Julia was born in Fredericton in 1796 and spent much of her early life visiting her father’s relatives in Cornwallis Valley, Nova Scotia, and travelling by canoe along the St. John River to her mother’s relatives in Quebec. It was on one of these trips that she began her literary career with St. Ursula’s Convent, a story based on the experiences of a relative with the nuns. Following the death of her husband, Nehemiah, Julie-Louise took her family to Montreal and Kingston where they visited her relatives, returning after five or six years.

In Kingston, on 3 January 1822, Julia Catherine Beckwith married George Henry Hart, a bookbinder, and they resided there for a time. She completed her first novel. St. Ursula’s Convent; or, the Nun of Canada, Containing Scenes from Real Life (Kingston, Upper Canada, printed by Hugh C. Thomson, 1824, Boards, 2 Vols.) was published in Toronto. Four copies are known to exist: one in the Toronto Public Library, one in the Congressional Library, and two in the library of the University of New Brunswick. A second novel, Tonnawanda; or The Adopted Son of America, An Indian Story (Rochester, New York), was published sometime between 1826 and 1831. About 1826 the Harts moved to Rochester, New York, and in 1831 to Fredericton where Julia resided the rest of her life. George Henry Hart, her husband, was employed in the Crown Land Department. For many years she contributed to The Reporter.

George and Julia Hart had a family of seven children: Adolphus; Nehemiah Beckwith; James; F. Marvin, buried here; Charles L.; Julia, born in Fredericton 1838; and Theodore, born 1840.

F. Marvin Hart married Jane Elizabeth Grigor. The couple had two children: a son, Grigor Jonff, and a daughter, Marianne. They lived in the James Grigor “cottage,” the second house east of St. Dunstan’s Church, which survived a terrible fire in 1850. It was estimated that three hundred buildings were burned. Owing to the frantic exertions of the parishioners, the Church and this small cottage were saved. In 1862, F. Marvin Hart opened a clothing store, The Bee Hive, and operated it for half a century. According to Cathedral records, Jane Grigor Hart died in May 1865 aged 39. Late in the century, Marvin, then an old man, moved to Saint John where he lived out the rest of his life with his wife’s sister, Mary Grigor.

Herald, Fredericton, NB, 13 February 1903:

Miss Mary Grigor, a sister of the late Mrs. Hart (Jane) died in St. John yesterday at the home of her niece Mrs. Frank H. White. The remains will arrive here tomorrow morning, and will be interred in the old burying ground.

Three men named John Lothrop Marsh

Marsh

Lot #182. This double lot was purchased by John Lothrop Marsh III, Police Magistrate, in 1859. He and his wife, Hester, are buried here with his parents, John Lothrop Marsh, Jr. and Sophia Miriam Beckwith, and his sisters, Julia and Sophia. Also here are the two children of Sophia and her husband Laughlan McLean. The grandparents of the police magistrate, John Lothrop Marsh and his wife Sarah Estabrooks, are buried in this graveyard and may be buried in this lot.

John L. Marsh, born 12 July 1758, died 3 May 1859. His wife, Sarah Estabrooks, born 10 October 1764, died 2 January 1844 aged 80.

John Lothrop Marsh, born 12 July 1796, died 1853. His wife, Sophie Miriam Beckwith, born [?], died 1851.

John Lothrop Marsh, born 22 January 1830, died 1914. His wife, Hester Frink, born 1839, died 1917 aged 78.

Only the small stone to the two children marks the Marsh lot today:

In memory of John L. Marsh, d. Dec. 13, 1856, ae 11 months, 21 days. Sophia Marion Beckwith, d. May 25, 1862, ae 2 years and 4 months.

Johnnie and Minnie, children of Lauchlan and Sophia L. McLean.

There is another little hand /To Heaven’s sweet harp and strings given /Another gentle seraph’s voice /Another star in heaven.

The first John Lothrop Marsh here was a Loyalist, born in Fairfield, Connecticut, the son of Simeon Marsh and Eunice Lothrop. His sisters were Elizabeth, who married Lt. Leonard Reed in 1793, and Sarah, who married Valentine Harding in 1795. His brothers were Solomon and Ebenezer, who went to Upper Canada in 1782 to live, and the Reverend Thomas Marsh, a missionary to Tennessee.

John Lothrop Marsh, the Loyalist, came to New Brunswick in 1783. In 1790 he married, in Canning, Sarah, daughter of Elijah Estabrooks of Cornwallis, Nova Scotia. Their children were Thomas Lothrop (born 1791), Elizabeth (born 1793), Charles William (born 1794), John Lothrop (born 1796), Elijah (born 1799), and George (born 1802).

John Lothrop Marsh, the son, in 1824 married Sophia Miriam Beckwith, a daughter of Nehemiah Beckwith and Julie-Louise Le Brun de Duplessis. Sophia was a sister of the Honourable John A. Beckwith and of the author Julia Beckwith Hart who is buried elsewhere in this burial ground. She was living in Kingston with her widowed mother, who, upon the death of Nehemiah, had taken her family there, probably to join her widowed sister, Elizabeth, Madame Antoine Ferland.

New Brunswick Royal Gazette, 23 November 1824:

Married at Quebec, on Sunday the 10th ult. by the Rev. Doctor Mountain, Mr. John Lothrop Marsh, of Wakefield, N.B. to Miss Sophia Beckwith, of Kingston, Upper Canada.

The census for 1851 lists John L. Marsh, merchant, 50, living with his children: Amelia, 23; John L., 21; Sophia, 18; Julia, 16; Arthur, 13; and Sarah, 10. His wife’s residence at the time of the census is not known.

John Lothrop Marsh [III] was admitted to the Bar of New Brunswick in 1854 and was a partner of the firm Marsh and Beckwith. He married Hester C. Frink, eldest daughter of S.P. Frink, in 1859. He and his sister Julia were the executors of their father’s will in 1871.

Julia Louise Le Brun Marsh married Edward John Russell, artist and illustrator, who was employed before his marriage as a bookkeeper at the Beckwith & Marsh lumber mill. She died in 1880, survived by her husband, five sons, and a daughter.

Sophia Le Brun Marsh, the second sister of John Lothrop Marsh, married Lauchlan McLean, a merchant, the son of a Scottish settler at Grand Lake. A few years after their marriage, the couple moved to Saint John. Besides the two buried here, their children were Hugh Havelock (born 22 March 1854), Arthur B. (born 1857), Charles Herbert, and Maud. Their eldest son, Major General Hugh Havelock McLean, was Lieutenant Governor of New Brunswick 1928-1935.

Census, Fredericton, NB, 1871:

John L. MARSH, 42, b. NB, Lawyer, Wesleyan Methodist

Hester, 32, b. NB, Wesleyan Methodist

Hugh McLEAN, 17, b. NB, Student, Wesleyan Methodist

Eliza PETERS, 23, b. NB, Servant, Maid, African.

On 1 May 1871, an Act was passed "Relating to the Police Establishment in the City of Fredericton," regulating the office of the Police Magistrate. John Marsh was appointed to that position, to receive an annual salary not exceeding $400. He was empowered to appoint a police force, a staff of able men, not exceeding three. Included was a caution about the taverns of the town: a section of the Act stated that if a tavern keeper harboured or entertained any policeman on duty, he could be fined or have his license cancelled by the magistrate. Forty-two years later, on his 84th birthday, John Lothrop Marsh was still holding that office.

In 1871, John Marsh was appointed Lieutenant Colonel of the 71st York Battalion of Infantry, and was still in command in 1885. He lived at 690 George Street. He is described as very dapper, immaculately turned out. He always wore a frock coat to the Sunday services at the Cathedral. In 1881 census shows John Marsh, Police Magistrate, living with his wife, Hester, and two daughters: Florence L., 9, and Mary Sophie (born 1874), aged 6.

Royal Gazette, Fredericton, NB, 2 August 1882:

PROCLAMATION

Whereas some person or persons did on the night of the thirty-first of July last make a felonious assault with firearms upon John L. Marsh, Esquire, Police Magistrate, at his residence in Fredericton: I do therefore publish this Proclamation and do hereby offer a Reward of Two Hundred Dollars for such information as will secure the conviction of the person or persons guilty of said offence.

Given under my Hand and Seal at Fredericton, the second day of August, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighty-two, and in the forty-sixth year of Her Majesty’s Reign. — By Command of the Lieutenant Governor P.A. Landry