The family of George Harding, Maugerville Loyalist

Harding

John Harding, born March 1st, 1774, died January 9th, 1866

Sarah Harding, born April 29th, 1776, died August 5th, 1858

John Harding in 1851 was a farmer and his three-storey house was the largest in St. Mary’s. He was very well off and acquired a great deal of property. In 1851 he and his wife, Sarah Barker, were living alone.

John Harding was brought to New Brunswick by his father, George Harding (c.1744-1808), Loyalist. In 1783 George Harding purchased Lot 74 in Maugerville from Samuel and Sarah Bridges, and he was listed in the Sunbury County Poll Book, 1795, with home and freehold in Maugerville. Mrs. Harding, "consort of George Harding," died in 1795.

George Harding deeded his slave Sippeo to his son John, "to be his property and his heirs and successors during the life of the said negro…." The indenture was dated 1784 and signed in 1802 by the Justice of the Peace at Maugerville, Elijah Miles. This interesting document was given to the Legislative Library, Fredericton and is framed. John Harding willed his slaves to his sister, Elizabeth, the second wife of the Loyalist Captain Elijah Miles. Sippeo became the verger of Christ Church, Maugerville.

The names George, John, and William appear frequently in the various branches of the Harding family, who came from Derry, Ireland by way of Newburgh, New York,. Another George Harding, 1770-1843, settled near Saint John and married Jane Spragg (or Sprague) at Belleisle, NB. He was the son of Capt. William Harding (1745-1818), who is buried at the Loyalist Cemetery, Saint John, and his wife, Leah Sarah Gillies. William Harding seems to have been the brother of the George Harding who settled in Maugerville.

Jonathan George Harding in 1846 was a cabinetmaker. Payments for work done while renovating the Assembly Room (Journals of the House of Assembly, 1846) included: J.G. Harding, for making tables for the Assembly Room; Thomas Armstrong, for making carpet; Thomas Aiken, cutting and laying down carpet repairing desks; T.C. Everett, stove and pipe; Thomas Stewart, coal scuttles; Spafford Barker, firearms; William Morgan, grates for the Assembly Room; and Justin Spahnn, repairing clock and care thereof.

The Hovey and Hooper families

Hovey

“Hovey” – there is nothing else inscribed on this handsome stone. The lot is #116 and is in the name of Stephen Hovey.

Sept. 27th [1866] Elizabeth Hovey claims on behalf of her father and his family a lot in the B. Ground, formally known as the "Hooper lot." Size about 18 feet square, and adjoining the Robb lot. Enclosed by a wooden railing. This lot was first purchased by Mrs. Hooper from Henry Chestnut.

Stephen Hovey, born 1812, a son of Stephen and Harriet Sayre Hovey, is most likely buried here, as well as his wife, Eliza Jane Agnew, born 1816. They lived in Fredericton from 1830 to 1900. Stephen Hovey was a filer on Charlotte Street. According to the census, 1861, their children were James, aged 22; Jane, 19; Rebecca and Harriet, twins, 17; Mary Alice, 14; Stephen E., 12; Allan, 10; Robert, 8; Isabell, 6; Charles, 4; and Elizabeth, 2. In the 1871 census the children of the household were Isabell, 15; Charles, 13; Elizabeth, 11; and Clara, 9. In the 1881 census, Stephen J. Hovey, 63, carpenter, and his wife Jane, 59, are listed with three of their daughters: Isabell, 24, a dressmaker; Lizzie, 20; and Clara, 18.

The first of the name, Aaron Hovey, came to the lower St. John River in 1769. In 1770 he claimed a 200-acre lot in consequence of a lease to Edmund Price, the father of his wife Dorothy. In 1783, according to the Studholm Report, he was living in Gagetown in a log house, with about 10 acres cleared. He eventually settled in the Miramichi. The children of Aaron Hovey and Dorothy Price were Janet, Abigail, Dorothy, Stephen (born 1783), Mary, Aaron (born 1788), Susanna (born 1793), Edmund (born 1795), James, Moses, Jacob Barker (born 1801), Allen, Jane (born 1797), and Asenath Ann (born 1808). Four daughters of Aaron Hovey married into Price families.

Aaron Hovey died 1839 in Ludlow, New Brunswick.

Royal Gazette, Fredericton, NB, 25 December 1839:

Died at Ludlow [Southwest Miramichi], after a short illness, This truly pious and exemplary Christian was born in Massachusetts, then a British colony, in 1761. He had been a resident of the parish of Ludlow for 28 years, during the whole of which period it had been his constant practice to assemble his neighbours upon the Sabbath day for the public worship of God. Upon these occasions he confined himself to reading the scriptures, prayer and exhortations to the holiness of life. His aim was to glorify his Creator and to benefit his destitute fellow men, not to exalt himself, hence his public devotions were marked by great simplicity and primitive brevity, and his private walk and conversation by manners plain and unassuming. To a neighbourhood devoid of regular religious instruction, as in the case with the community in which he lived, such a loss cannot easily be repaired. He closed his useful and blameless life on the 30th day of November, aged 78 years. He has left 126 descendants.

The Hoveys and Hoopers were related through marriage, and many unmarked graves of the Hooper family lie here.

In 1843, N.D. Hooper was a prominent member of the Kirk when the Reverend John M. Brooke arrived. In the 1860s, Nehemiah S. Hooper had a large business of groceries, liquors, and provisions, under the County Court House.

Isabel Agnew Hovey (born 1860) married, in 1880, W. Storey Hooper whose mother had been a Hovey. They lived at 114 George Street, which house had been owned and occupied for generations by the Hooper family. Storey Hooper, insurance agent, was manager of the Fredericton Exhibition Association and in 1912 was Mayor of Fredericton. He died in 1929, and his wife in 1940.

The Chestnuts of Chestnut Canoe Co. Ltd.

Chestnut

William Turnbull Chestnut, 1867-1935

Ida C. Chestnut, 1870-1935.

Richard Henry Chestnut, died Oct. 24 1940, aged 32 years.

Maggie Jean Chestnut died Feb. 5, 1949, aged 43 years.

Harry Grenville Chestnut died July 23, 1941, aged 68 years.

A small stone inscribed "A.C.C." marks the grave of an infant, child of Will and Ida Chestnut. A larger recently erected stone now commemorates this family. Five footstones are marked "W.T.C.," "I.C.C.," "Dick," "M.J.C.," and "H.G.C."

Henry Grenville Chestnut claims a lot #179, in the New Part of the Burial Grounds, size about 15 x 20 feet. Bounded on the north side [illegible] and in between the 3rd and 4th walks from Allen St. Enclosed with an iron railing with the name Chestnut on the gate and marked Father and Mother inscribed therein. Mr. Chestnut also claims another lot, #119. Mr. Chestnut purchased this lot in the year 1863 for the sum of $15.00.

The Chestnut family lived on Waterloo Row. Harry G. Chestnut (born 1873) was President of the Chestnut Canoe Co. Ltd., which he founded about 1905 with his brother William Turnbull ("Will") Chestnut (born 1867). Will and Harry were sons of Henry Chestnut and his wife, Helen Brown Turnbull.

William T. Chestnut in 1907 married Ida Barker in Saint John.

Harry G. Chestnut married Annie Isabel Tibbits (born 1875) in 1902. The Nativity Window in Wilmot Church, dedicated on 16 April 1962, was donated by Mrs. Harry G. Chestnut in memory of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Richard White Longmuir Tibbits, and of her husband’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Chestnut.

Richard Henry, the son of Harry G. Chestnut, was born 11 February 1908. He married Sarah Elizabeth Howes in October 1936.

Maggie Jean Chestnut (1906-1949), his sister, graduated from the University of New Brunswick in 1927. She was a member of the university’s Senate and a prominent member of the community. The Maggie Jean Chestnut Residence on Charlotte Street (later Renaissance College) was not her home but a gift to the university in her memory.