Robert Slowman, plasterer

Slowman

Our Mother, Harriet Slowman

Thou art gone to thy rest Mother / We will not weep for thee / For thou are gone where oft on earth / Thy spirit longed to be. / Thou art gone to thy rest Mother / Thy toil and cares art o’er / And sorrow, pains and sufferings / Shall n’er distress thee more. /Thou art gone to thy rest Mother / Thy sins are all forgiven / And saints in light have welcomed thee / To share the joys of heaven. / Thou art gone to thy rest Mother / Death has no sting for thee / Thy dear Redeemer’s power hath gained thee / For thee the victory.

Harriet was the wife of Robert Slowman, plasterer, from England. Their son Robert married in 1849.

Morning News, Saint John, NB, 23 July 1849:

Married at St. Paul’s Church, Fredericton, on the 16th inst., by the Rev. John M. Brooke, Robert Slowman, to Miss Mary Ann Johnston both of that city.

Two years later, the 1851 census lists Robert Slowman, aged 21, as a prisoner of Charles Brannen, Deputy Sheriff of York County. In the household of Robert Slowman, 57, and Harriet, 48, were two children: Charles Johnston Slowman, aged one year, and Mary, aged 12.

The census of 1861 shows Robert and Harriet Slowman living with two daughters, Sarah I. Cass, aged 29, and Mary Cushman, 23, as well as an 8-year-old granddaughter, Harriet Cass. The family lived on George Street between Smythe and Northumberland Streets, but returned to the United States after Harriet’s death.

Many Fredericton houses today bear silent witness to the craft of Victorian-era plasterers such as Robert Slowman, the ceilings decorated with cornices and medallions that could not easily be replaced.

Dr. James Robb

Robb

Lot #45 was jointly owned by the Robb and Ward families. Today there is no sign of the wooden fence which once enclosed the lot.

Sacred to the memory of James Robb, M.D., Professor of Natural Science in the University of New Brunswick, born at Stirling, Scotland, Feb. 2, 1815, died at Fredericton, N.B., April 2, 1861.

Erected by members of the Fredericton Society of St. Andrew as a token of respect for the memory of one who long and ably filled the office of their President and who was universally esteemed as a gentleman, a scholar and a benefactor to this Province.

A St. Andrew’s Cross marks this grave.

Dr. James Robb, who joined the staff of King’s College in 1837, was the first professor of Chemistry. He had studied medicine in Edinburgh University but was more interested in Natural Science. He came to New Brunswick to accept the position of lecturer in Chemistry and Natural History in King’s College. A loved and respected teacher, Robb devoted himself to the agricultural interests of the Province. He was appointed Secretary of the Provincial Board of Agriculture when it was established in 1858. His valuable collection of species is now in the New Brunswick Museum.

Dr. Robb was a surgeon, 3rd York County Militia. He was prominent in the formation, 23 April 1847, and continuance of the Fredericton Athenaeum, a scientific and literary society of which Archdeacon Coster was president. Robb was the secretary, and prepared the astronomical material for the almanac issued by the society. In 1849 he was a chosen a member of the first Council of Fredericton. It was he who designed the city’s coat-of-arms.

Dr. Jack, Dr. Robb, and Marshal d’Avray together weathered the stormy criticism of King’s College during the 1850s, until in 1859 the Act to establish the University of New Brunswick was passed. All three are buried in this graveyard, near the grave lot of John Gregory, a foremost critic. Although James Robb and John Gregory held different views as to the necessary curricula for New Brunswick youth, when James Robb was president of the St. Andrew’s Society in 1860, the first vice-president was John Gregory.

Dr. Robb’s wife, Ellen, was a daughter of the Venerable Archdeacon Coster, and she is buried here beside her husband in an unmarked grave. Their daughter Catherine E. married John Black, a barrister of Fredericton. In 1900 when Mrs. Clarke Murray of Montreal founded the Imperial Order, Daughters of the Empire, Mrs. John Black formed the first Chapter.

John Richards and family

Richards

John Richards claims a lot 10 x 20 NEW PART adjoining the Odell lot. Enclosed by granite posts with iron rods and chains. Mr. Richards purchases this lot from George Botsford.

Only the markers are left: “H.A.R.,” “J.R.,” “E.R.,” “T.R.,” “G.L.R.,” “J.O.W.R.,” and “J.T.R.”

John Richards was born in 1823 and married Helen Ann Long, born 1826. Their children were Helen M., James F., Charles L., Fanny F., Minnie B., and Annie. In the 1851 census, John Richards, 28, is listed with his wife, Helen A., 25, and an infant daughter, Sarah. In 1862 he was a commission merchant, furniture dealer, insurance agent, city auditor, ticket agent, and a prominent Mason. He was a sitting magistrate of York County in the 1870s. He also was secretary-treasurer of the Fredericton Railway Company of which Thomas Temple was President, 1876. When he died in 1897, John Richards was assistant Clerk of the Legislative Assembly.

The marker "E.R." probably refers to John Richards’s Welsh mother, Eleanor, who lived in Fredericton with A.P. Miller and family in 1871.

Descendants of the Honourable and Reverend Jonathan Odell

Odell

Sacred to the memory of Elizabeth Ludlow, wife of George M. Odell, M.D., of Fredericton who died April 19, 1861 in the 35th year of her age. "Them that sleep in Jesus will God bring with him."

George Mountain Odell, M.D., died at Newport, Rhode Island, April 21, 1892 in the 75th year of his age. "I believe in the life everlasting."

Charles Odell, C.E., May 27, 1898. Sadie Odell, Dec. 3, 1910. Erected in loving memory of our dear father and mother.

These three tombstones are surrounded by a stone fence.

G.M. Odell at present at Newport State of Rhode Island claims a lot in the burying lot 18 x 24, situate in the north corner enclosed by a wooden fence set on stones. Purchased from Robert Wood about 1861.

The Honourable and Reverend Jonathan Odell came to New Brunswick in 1783 with the New England Loyalists. A clergyman of the Church of England, he was for many years the government Secretary of the Province. His only son, Hon. William Franklin Odell (1774-1844), also a Loyalist, had four sons: William Hunter, George Mountain, James, and Charles. The house in which they were born and brought up had been built by their grandfather, Rev. Jonathan Odell. Their father, William F. Odell, later built "Rookwood", and the original family home ultimately became a residence for the youngest son, Charles.

George Mountain Odell lived for some time in St. Mary’s on the Caleb Fowler farm, which his father subsequently bequeathed to him in 1844. In 1846 he bought a town house in Brunswick Street from Horatio Nelson Drake and married not long after.

Royal Gazette, Fredericton, NB, 3 November 1847:

Married on Tuesday, the 26th ult. at St. Paul’s Church, Halifax, by the Rev. Dr. Twining, Chaplain of the Garrison, George Mountain Odell M.D., son of the late Hon. W.F. Odell of Fredericton, N.B., to Elizabeth Ludlow, daughter of D.L. Robinson, an uncle of Deputy Commissary General Robinson.

Dr. G.M. Odell married, secondly, Susan Philipse, daughter of Morris Robinson. She was a cousin of the Honourable F.P. Robinson. In 1865, Mrs. George Lee bequeathed to Susan P. Odell, her niece, wife of Dr. George M. Odell, £100, “also her work table and sofa table,” and a portrait of her father Morris Robinson. There is no inscription here in memory of Dr. Odell’s second wife.

New Brunswick Reporter, Fredericton, NB, 27 April 1892:

Intelligence of the death of Dr. Geo. M. Odell at Newport, R.I. last week was heard with sorrow by many of the old families in Fredericton whose physician and friend the deceased had been. Dr. Odell was for many years a leading physician here. His remains were brought to this city Monday and interred in the family enclosure in the old cemetery. The chief mourners were Capt. Odell, nephew of the deceased; Delancy Robinson, F.A.H. Straton and Geo. C. Hunt. Closely following these were all of the city physicians. The pall bearers were Sir John Allen, Judge Fraser, Lt. Col. Maunsell, Andrew Inches, E.H. Wilmot and J. Henry Phair. Capt. Odell was at the bedside for a couple of days before he died and accompanied the remains to the city. Rev. G.G. Roberts performed the last rites at the grave.

Charles Odell, born 16 August 1826, was twice married, first to Maynard Eliza Grange (born 1835) by whom he had two children, Florence Mary and George Grange. In 1867, Charles married, secondly, Sarah, daughter of John D. Kinnear, Judge of Probate for Cumberland County, Nova Scotia. They had five children. His eldest son, George Grange Odell, often visited his father from South America where he worked as an engineer. It is remembered that one of his parrots hid in the Cathedral and disrupted a Sunday service.

Their house, occupied for a hundred years or more by the Odell family, is now the Deanery. It is shown in the first town plat, the plan of which was made by Lieut. Dugald Campbell. Above each of the two upper rooms was a loft or sleeping quarter, entirely separate. The large iron rings bolted into the woodwork were probably placed there to chain deserters during one of the early periods of the movement of troops through Fredericton. Until 1844, this house with gardens, yards, stables, outhouses, together with land in rear, extended to Charlotte Street.