“Our Babies” Stella and Robbie Wilson

Wilson

Zitella Elizabeth Wilson Nov 24

Robert Arthur Wilson, Dec. 1, aged 4

Elizabeth Wilson, 1837-1898

This stone sits on the Pinder lot. A record made for the York-Sunbury Historical Society in 1938 reads: “Elizabeth, wife of John Wilson, died November 23rd, 1898, aged 61 years.”

From the Cathedral records of 1885 we learn of the tragic loss of a little son and daughter commemorated by the double tombstone, "OUR BABIES Stella and Robbie." Zitella [Zitelia] E. Wilson was 7 years old. The children died of diphtheria.

John Wilson, Sergeant, 15th Regiment, and his wife, Elizabeth, had a son baptised Charles James on 5 October 1885.

The Holden Turner family

Turner

In Memory of John, son of John and Agnes Turner, who died May 12, 1860, aged 9 years and 7 mo’s

Agnes, the first child of John and Agnes Turner died in infancy. She also is buried here, her grave unmarked.

John Turner was a son of George Hutchinson Turner and his wife, Catherine Russell. He was a grandson of Holden Turner and Jennet Hutchinson, and of Jacob and Elizabeth Russell, Loyalists who settled in Kingsclear.

Holden Turner was born about 1761 in Ayr, Scotland, and came to New Brunswick in 1784. He was a member of St. Paul’s Church in 1843. Holden and Jennet had ten children. Uncles of John Turner operated the Turner American Express out of Saint John and were prosperous. John Turner drove the stage coach from Fredericton to St. Andrews and later the Woodstock stage.

Agnes was a daughter of Ebenezer Nicholson, who came to New Brunswick with his wife and children from Dumfries and settled in the parish of Douglas. The family attended the old Kirk. Another daughter, Sarah, married Robert Irwin, whose sister Margaret married Robert Colwell. Hugh Irwin, brother of Robert, married Matilda, the sister of William Grieves. This explains the proximity of the graves of the Turner, Irwin, Colwell, and Grieves families.

Buried here are Agnes and John, the first two children of John and Agnes Turner. The eldest six of John’s ten children were born in Fredericton. After 1860, the family apparently moved about and in 1865 were in Rivière-du-Loup. Agnes Turner died there in 1896, and John died in Winnipeg in 1911.

Margery Elizabeth, 1851-1854, child of J.S. and Susan Turner.

This inscription is on the reverse of the large Sampson stone.

Joshua S. Turner, a grandson of Holden Turner, had married Susan Johnson in 1851. She was a daughter of Margery Elizabeth Johnson, as was Jane, wife of Thomas Sampson, whose son Charles was the Fredericton agent for the Turner Express. Margery Johnson’s will in 1873 mentions a widowed Jane Sampson. She kept a grocery store in Fredericton, as did Joshua Turner in Saint John. He was also listed as a Commission Merchant and a ship owner/broker. The Saint John Directory lists him living at 130 Charlotte Street.

Wilmot Church records, Fredericton, NB:

Turner, Henry, son of Susan and Joshua Turner, merchant of Fredericton, b. 27 Oct. 1851, bapt. 14 March 1852.

Turner, Margery Elizabeth b. July 13, 1853, bapt. 16 Aug. 1854. Daughter of Joshua and Susan.

Joshua Sylvester, b. 14 May 1867 bapt. 15 Sept 1867, son of Joshua and Susan, green grocer of St. John.

William D. Speight, aged 4

Speight

In Memory of William D., son of David T. and Susan Speight, died November 11th, 1859, aged 4 years

They laid him under the fresh green sod / With a heart almost broken yet trusting in God / The heart and the form which I cherished here / I shall meet again in a happier sphere

David Speight, father of little William, was born in 1823, was a sea captain and lived at Indiantown most of his life. He suffered a stroke eleven years before his death at the home of his son Allen in Maywood, New Jersey, in 1891. This small lot was unclaimed in 1886. Only the base remains of the stone once marking this grave. It is very close to the Thomas Estey plot.

Thomas Sampson, Charles Sampson, and Turner’s Express

Sampson

Thomas Sampson 1807-1854

Jane Sampson 1819-1900

James Henry 1843-1846

Jane 1841-1915

Children of Thomas and Jane Sampson

Thomas Sampson came from England in 1830 with his wife and a baby. His wife died upon arrival, and he was remarried to Jane Johnson, who was Irish. He was a tinsmith and a printer.

Saint John, NB, 23 January 1854:

Deaths at Fredericton on the 17th inst. Mr. Thomas Sampson, aged 49 years, formerly of Devonshire, England.

The census for 1861 shows the widow Jane Sampson, 43, living with her children Thomas, 22, printer; Charles, 21; Jane, 19; John, 15; and William, 13. Hutchinson’s New Brunswick Directory for 1865-1866 lists Jane Sampson, widow of Thomas, and her two eldest sons located at Carleton near King Street. Thomas was a printer and Charles A. was an agent for Turner’s Express. Mary, Thomas Sampson’s daughter by his first wife, married John Harrison in 1859 at Portland, Maine.

New Brunswick Directory for 1865-66:

Turner’s American Express, Charles A. Sampson, Agent, Queen Street forwards packages and parcels of goods and money, goods purchased, notes, drafts and bills collected, Fredericton, St. John, Halifax, Boston, New York.

Turner’s Express was an active company, with agents in towns throughout the province. The elder Sampson may also have been connected with the business. In 1833 the schedule was Fredericton to Saint John, stopping overnight en route, proceeding the next day to Eastport, this part of the journey by stage. The following day at noon a sailing ship left Eastport for Boston, a trip that usually took two and a half days. This was speedier and more pleasant than going all the way by stage, which took eleven days.

The Gleaner, Fredericton, NB, 25 October, 1895:

Thomas Sampson, formerly of this city, but for some time back employed on the staff of a daily newspaper in Norwich, Conn., is in Fredericton on a visit. This is his first visit during 27 years. Mr. Sampson served his apprenticeship to the Art Preservative with the late John Simpson, Queen’s Printer in the Royal Gazette office. He is a brother of C.A. Sampson, Secretary of the Board of School Trustees. In his first stroll down Queen Street in 27 years, accompanied by his sister, he received quite an ovation from numerous old friends. About 1866 Mr. Sampson was an active member of the old Victoria Rifles (Capt. Simonds) of this city, as well as the old No. 1 engine company (Capt. John Moore) at present our esteemed city treasurer.

Jane, the widow of Thomas Sampson, is remembered as residing in Carleton Street with her unmarried daughter, “Jenny.” The family was prominent in the work of the Wilmot Church, and Charles Sampson was for many years Secretary of the Fredericton School Board.